Audio Recording Interview H0061: with Ngawang Temba [tib. ngag dbang bstan pa], (India, 9 June 1993)

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About this Item

Title
Interview H0061: with Ngawang Temba [tib. ngag dbang bstan pa], (India, 9 June 1993)
Contributor Names
Paljor Tsarong (interviewer)
Goldstein, Melvyn (editor)
Ngawang Temba -- b. circa 1922 (interviewee)
Created / Published
Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio.
Notes
-  India (place of recording)
-  The interview was conducted and recorded in Tibetan and translated into English. (contents)
-  Interview in Tibetan.
-  This document is part of the Political History Collection of the Tibetan Oral History and Archive Project, edited by Melvyn Goldstein, and published by the Center for Research on Tibet, Department of Anthropology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio.
-  male (gender)
Form
sound recording
Extent
3 text files
3 digital audio files
Part 1: 40 min 52 s
Part 2: 95 min 2 s
Part 3: 53 min 55 s
Language
Online Format
audio
online text
pdf
Description
Part 1: Ngawang Temba, was a Sera Mey monk who became a monastic manager (tib. chandzö). He was originally from Lhasa from the household called Tsongkhang Sarpa [“New Shop”]. He became a monk in Sera monastery and then became a Chandzö (manager), but was mainly involved in trade in northern Tibet. He discusses how monk soldiers were sent to fight in Chamdo in 1950 and then in detail about the People’s Association of 1951-52. Part 2: Ngawang Temba, was a Sera Mey monk who became a monastic manager (tib. chandzö). He was originally from Lhasa from the household called Tsongkhang Sarpa [“New Shop”]. He became a monk in Sera monastery and then became a Chandzö (manager), but was mainly involved in trade in northern Tibet. He discusses how monk soldiers were sent to fight in Chamdo in 1950 and then in detail about the People’s Association of 1951-52. Part 3: Ngawang Temba, was a Sera Mey monk who became a monastic manager (tib. chandzö). He was originally from Lhasa from the household called Tsongkhang Sarpa [“New Shop”]. He became a monk in Sera monastery and then became a Chandzö (manager), but was mainly involved in trade in northern Tibet. He discusses how monk soldiers were sent to fight in Chamdo in 1950 and then in detail about the People’s Association of 1951-52. sound recording | 3 text files | 3 digital audio files | Part 1: 40 min 52 s | Part 2: 95 min 2 s | Part 3: 53 min 55 s | India (Place Of Recording). The interview was conducted and recorded in Tibetan and translated into English. (Contents). Interview in Tibetan. This document is part of the Political History Collection of the Tibetan Oral History and Archive Project, edited by Melvyn Goldstein, and published by the Center for Research on Tibet, Department of Anthropology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. male (Gender). Sound Recording (Form). So, that's about it for today. We could guess that the estates that belonged to the monastery will be eliminated and we thought that it would be okay because even if we didn't have the estates, we will be given a kind of basis [tib. rten]. The monks who knew the main point of the matter were thinking that the estates are not that useful [to the ordinary monks]. For example, the Sera Jiso [tib. spyi bso] had many estates and all of the incomes and expenditures of the estates were managed by two people. When they get the profit, they will take possession of it and they were regularly being stingy [in supplying things to the monks]. And when their term of office was over, they used to give a big amount of alms to the monks and they became kind of famous. When I recollect those things it was really meaningless. Actually, the monks need to have a good livelihood regularly. Then we arrived at Tawang [tib. rta dbang] and they still held a meeting, but I said that I am not going to attend the meeting. I was also sick at that time because I came along hungry and the people in Mön gave us the black grapes and we ate a lot so I had diarrhea. They still held meetings for three days in Tawang saying that they are going to fight. After that, [talking about] fighting vanished.
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Cite This Item

Citations are generated automatically from bibliographic data as a convenience, and may not be complete or accurate.

Chicago citation style:

Paljor Tsarong, Melvyn Goldstein, and Ngawang Temba. Interview H: with Ngawang Temba tib. ngag dbang bstan pa, India, 9 June 1993. Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, 1993. Pdf. https://www.loc.gov/item/tohap.H0061/.

APA citation style:

Paljor Tsarong, Goldstein, M. & Ngawang Temba. (1993) Interview H: with Ngawang Temba tib. ngag dbang bstan pa, India, 9 June 1993. Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. [Pdf] Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/tohap.H0061/.

MLA citation style:

Paljor Tsarong, Melvyn Goldstein, and Ngawang Temba. Interview H: with Ngawang Temba tib. ngag dbang bstan pa, India, 9 June 1993. Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, 1993. Pdf. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, <www.loc.gov/item/tohap.H0061/>.