Film, Video Black Mesa: Water, Power, and the Story of a Master Theft

About this Item

Title
Black Mesa: Water, Power, and the Story of a Master Theft
Summary
In this era of transnational corporations, the methods of separating indigenous peoples from their lands are many, and often quite legal - at least to those making the laws. When Native lands hold important energy resources, like coal, the human rights and environmental impacts take place far from mainstream media. Forty years ago the National Academy of Sciences declared that Black Mesa, Arizona might have to be a National Sacrifice Area. In an era of global warming and climate change, key questions remain: Whose sacrifice and for what reasons?
Event Date
November 18, 2009
Notes
-  Judith Nies is an author, essayist, and teacher. She has worked as a journalist, teacher, historian, researcher, and speechwriter. Her memoir and narrative history of the 1960s "The Girl I Left Behind" was published in June 2008 by Harper Collins. Her books include: "Nine Women: Portraits from the American Radical Tradition" (UCal Press, 2002), and "Native American History" (Ballantine, 1996). Her essays and reviews have been published in The New York Times, Boston Globe, The Progressive, American Voice, and Orion. Her essay "The Black Mesa Syndrome," which was a finalist for the John Oaks Environmental Journalism Award, is included in the anthology "The Future of Nature" (Milkweed Press 2008). Awards include a Bunting Fellowship at Harvard/Radcliffe, Rockefeller Foundation Bellagio grant, Ludvig Vogelstein Foundation grant and residences at MacDowell, Mesa Refuge, and Yaddo artists colonies. She teaches writing at Massachusetts College of Art and is a member of PEN America. She grew up in Swampscott, Massachusetts and currently lives in Cambridge.
Related Resources
John W. Kluge Center: http://www.loc.gov/loc/kluge/
Running Time
56 minutes, 38 seconds
Language
English
Online Format
video

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Credit Line: Library of Congress

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Chicago citation style:

Black Mesa: Water, Power, and the Story of a Master Theft. 2009. Video. https://www.loc.gov/item/webcast-4814/.

APA citation style:

(2009) Black Mesa: Water, Power, and the Story of a Master Theft. [Video] Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/webcast-4814/.

MLA citation style:

Black Mesa: Water, Power, and the Story of a Master Theft. 2009. Video. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, <www.loc.gov/item/webcast-4814/>.

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