Film, Video And Wheat Completed the Cycle: Flour Mills, Social Memory, and Industrial Culture in Sonora, Mexico

About this Item

Title
And Wheat Completed the Cycle: Flour Mills, Social Memory, and Industrial Culture in Sonora, Mexico
Summary
"The abandoned flour mills throughout the region," said a Mexican researcher interviewed during fieldwork in northern Mexico, "are the equivalent for Sonorans of the pyramids in Central Mexico." In this talk about her research as a Fulbright Fellow in Sonora, Mexico for the last nine months, folklorist and anthropologist Maribel Alvarez explores the role of wheat - a grain introduced by the Spanish to Mexico in the 16th century - as a central element in the construction of a distinct regional identity that prides itself on a simultaneous, and often contradictory, association with tradition AND modernity. As an alternative to the corn-based cultures of Mesoamerica and the ancient Southwest, Alvarez's work interrogates the role of social memory, desire, and nostalgia in relationship to the invention of patrimony. Her research on wheat embraces a multidisciplinary approach that illuminates in both scholarly and popular ways the existence of a "wheat-based worldview" in Sonora expressed through what Sonorans eat, how they talk, how they labor, and what they deem to be the greatest contribution of Sonoran farmers to humanity.
Event Date
April 21, 2010
Notes
-  Maribel Alvarez holds a dual appointment as Assistant Research Professor in the English Department and as Research Social Scientist at the Southwest Center, University of Arizona. She teaches courses on methods of cultural analysis with particular emphasis on objects, oral narratives, and visual cultures of the US-Mexico border. She has a Doctorate in Anthropology from the University of Arizona and a Masters Degree in Political Theory from California State University, Long Beach. She is also a member of the Board of Trustees of the American Folklife Center, Library of Congress.
Related Resources
American Folklife Center: http://www.loc.gov/folklife/
Running Time
59 minutes, 30 seconds
Language
English
Online Format
video

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Credit Line: Library of Congress

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Citations are generated automatically from bibliographic data as a convenience, and may not be complete or accurate.

Chicago citation style:

And Wheat Completed the Cycle: Flour Mills, Social Memory, and Industrial Culture in Sonora, Mexico. 2010. Video. https://www.loc.gov/item/webcast-4891/.

APA citation style:

(2010) And Wheat Completed the Cycle: Flour Mills, Social Memory, and Industrial Culture in Sonora, Mexico. [Video] Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/webcast-4891/.

MLA citation style:

And Wheat Completed the Cycle: Flour Mills, Social Memory, and Industrial Culture in Sonora, Mexico. 2010. Video. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, <www.loc.gov/item/webcast-4891/>.