Film, Video Preserving Creative America: Collecting Metadata for Recorded Sound

About this Item

Title
Preserving Creative America: Collecting Metadata for Recorded Sound
Summary
As part of the NDIIPP Briefing series, the Library of Congress hosted a presentation by John Spencer, president of BMS/Chace. Spencer leads a partnership with NDIIPP exploring the structured collection of audio multitrack metadata, working to create a shareable application that facilitates the gathering of technical and descriptive metadata across multiple roles in the recording process. This presentation highlights the technical and political background of the project, combined with a demonstration of the application and how it relates to the commercial audio industry.
Event Date
December 17, 2010
Notes
-  BMS/Chace President and co-founder John Spencer has widespread experience and visibility both in the music industry and in the fields of archival preservation and enterprise class information technology. Since 1978, he has been involved in many facets of high-technology professional audio and video, and was previously Vice-President of Sales and Marketing for Otari Corp. John is CEO and ambassador at large for BMS/Chace, preaching the gospel of structured metadata collection to media companies and institutions worldwide. His efforts led to a 3-year partnership with the Library of Congress, strategically focused on metadata best practices for the commercial recording industry.
Related Resources
Digital Preservation: http://www.digitalpreservation.gov
Running Time
48 minutes 36 seconds
Language
english
Online Format
video
Description
As part of the NDIIPP Briefing series, the Library of Congress hosted a presentation by John Spencer, president of BMS/Chace. Spencer leads a partnership with NDIIPP exploring the structured collection of audio multitrack metadata, working to create a shareable application that facilitates the gathering of technical and descriptive metadata across multiple roles in the recording process. This presentation highlights the technical and political background of the project, combined with a demonstration of the application and how it relates to the commercial audio industry.
Original Format
film, video

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Credit Line: Library of Congress

Cite This Item

Citations are generated automatically from bibliographic data as a convenience, and may not be complete or accurate.

Chicago citation style:

Preserving Creative America: Collecting Metadata for Recorded Sound. 2010. Video. https://www.loc.gov/item/webcast-5133/.

APA citation style:

(2010) Preserving Creative America: Collecting Metadata for Recorded Sound. [Video] Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/webcast-5133/.

MLA citation style:

Preserving Creative America: Collecting Metadata for Recorded Sound. 2010. Video. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, <www.loc.gov/item/webcast-5133/>.

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