Film, Video What the Autograph Can Tell Us: Beethoven's Sonata in E Major, Opus 109

About this Item

Title
What the Autograph Can Tell Us: Beethoven's Sonata in E Major, Opus 109
Summary
One of the treasures of the Library's collection of composers' autographs is the manuscript of Ludwig van Beethoven's late E major piano sonata. William Meredith presents a fascinating event with a distinguished collaborator, Malcolm Bilson, as partner. The talk and performance focuses on elements of the creative process visible in Beethoven's manuscript score, and some interesting details it can reveal about what Beethoven does not want the composer to do.
Event Date
September 10, 2011
Notes
-  William Meredith is the founding director of the Ira F. Brilliant Center for Beethoven Studies at San Jose State University, which opened to the public in 1985. He is editor of The Beethoven Journal and the scholarly monograph series American Beethoven Studies. He is currently working with Robin Wallace and Wayne Senner on the German reception history of Beethoven's music. He first studied the autograph of the Sonata Opus 109 when he was writing his dissertation on the compositional process of the work at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
-  A professor at the Music Department at Cornell University since 1968, Malcolm Bilson has distinguished himself as one of the pioneers in historic performance practice, specializing in performance on the fortepiano, the 18th century forerunner of the modern piano.
-  Shin Hwang made his public debut as a pianist performing Beethoven's Piano Concerto No. 3 with the Lafayette College Orchestra. He attended Edward Parmentier's harpsichord workshop, where he discovered his affinity for the harpsichord and early music. Since then he has performed both solo programs on the harpsichord and fortepiano and with the University of Michigan's baroque ensembles.
Related Resources
Music & Performing Arts at the Library of Congress: https://www.loc.gov/rr/perform/
Running Time
1 hours 19 minutes 21 seconds
Language
English
Online Format
video

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Credit Line: Library of Congress

Cite This Item

Citations are generated automatically from bibliographic data as a convenience, and may not be complete or accurate.

Chicago citation style:

What the Autograph Can Tell Us: Beethoven's Sonata in E Major, Opus 109. 2011. Video. https://www.loc.gov/item/webcast-6187/.

APA citation style:

(2011) What the Autograph Can Tell Us: Beethoven's Sonata in E Major, Opus 109. [Video] Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/webcast-6187/.

MLA citation style:

What the Autograph Can Tell Us: Beethoven's Sonata in E Major, Opus 109. 2011. Video. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, <www.loc.gov/item/webcast-6187/>.

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