Film, Video Conversation: Black Lives Matter & Music

Transcript: TEXT

About this Item

Title
Conversation: Black Lives Matter & Music
Summary
A panel of ethnomusicologists and contributors to the book "Black Lives Matter and Music" looked towards the present state of the movement to discuss economic injustices, gentrification and cultural displacement, as well as education disparities as enduring kinds of violence. The 2018 scholarly volume "Black Lives Matter and Music: Protest, Intervention, Reflection" collected critical studies which draw from ethnographic research and personal encounters to illustrate how scholarly research and teaching about the role of music in the Black Lives Matter movement can contribute to public awareness of social, economic, political, scientific and other injustice in our society. Michael Brown was shot and killed by police in 2014, catapulting digital activism from social media hashtags to uprisings in the streets. #SayHerName, a protest of police violence against Black women, followed. Black Lives Matter as a movement has been ardently committed to revealing who people are, but it is also rooted in a concern with revealing how things work. Systematic inequality was the reason for Alicia Garza's rallying cry for #BlackLivesMatter in 2013 after the acquittal of the killer of the unarmed 17-year old Trayvon Martin. Panelists also discussed how musicians continue to provide the soundtrack for the Black Lives Matter movement. Presented with the support of the Daniel A.P. Murray Association.
Event Date
June 05, 2019
Notes
-  Alison Martin is a contributor to the volume "Black Lives Matter and Music: Protest, Intervention, Reflection."
-  Folklorist and ethnomusicologist Stephanie Shonekan is a professor and the chair of the W.E.B. Du Bois Department of Afro-American Studies at University of Massachusetts, Amherst. She is a co-editor of the book "Black Lives Matter and Music: Protest, Intervention, Reflection" with Fernando Orejuela.
-  Fernando Orejuela is a senior lecturer in folklore and ethnomusicology and adjunct professor of African American and African diaspora studies and Latino studies at Indiana University. He is a co-editor of the book "Black Lives Matter and Music: Protest, Intervention, Reflection" with Stephanie Shonekan.
Running Time
32 minutes 15 seconds
Online Format
video
image
online text

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Credit Line: Library of Congress

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Chicago citation style:

Conversation: Black Lives Matter & Music. 2019. Video. https://www.loc.gov/item/webcast-8753/.

APA citation style:

(2019) Conversation: Black Lives Matter & Music. [Video] Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/webcast-8753/.

MLA citation style:

Conversation: Black Lives Matter & Music. 2019. Video. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, <www.loc.gov/item/webcast-8753/>.

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