Event Videos

The recordings of past events include lectures, book talks, topical presentations, and research orientations.

  • Film, Video
    Celebrating the NAACP Records at the Library of Congress Since 1964 the Library of Congress has served as the home of the historical records of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). Now totaling approximately four million items, the NAACP records are the largest single collection ever acquired by the Library and ranks annually among the most heavily used by researchers. The NAACP records are the cornerstone of the Library's...
    • Contributor: Browne-Marshall, Gloria J. - Hayden, Carla
    • Date: 2024-05-07
  • Film, Video
    Journals from Solar Eclipse Expeditions in the 1800s and Early 1900s Two Library specialists -- head of science reference JJ Harbster and historian Joshua Levy -- take a close look at personal journals and letters written by scientists in expedition groups, traveling across the world to view solar eclipses during the mid-1800s and early 1900s.
    • Contributor: Harbster, Jj - Levy, Joshua
    • Date: 2024-04-03
  • Film, Video
    What to Pack for a Solar Eclipse Expedition in the Late 1800s Two Library specialists -- head of science reference JJ Harbster and historian Joshua Levy -- look at a photo album more than a century old, compiled during an expedition to see a solar eclipse in on the coast of Angola in 1889. Looking through the album, the experts talk about what the sailors and scientists packed for the arduous journey to see the eclipse...
    • Contributor: Harbster, Jj - Levy, Joshua
    • Date: 2024-04-03
  • Film, Video
    DC: Fifty Years of Home Rule To commemorate the 50th anniversary of home rule in the District of Columbia, the Library sponsored a panel discussion on "50 Years of Home Rule" moderated by WAMU's Kojo Nnamdi ("The Politics Hour") and featuring Tom Sherwood (longtime D.C. journalist and co-author of "Dream City: Race, Power and the Decline of Washington D.C."), Judy Richardson (co-founder of the Drum and Spear Bookstore and "Eyes...
    • Contributor: Sommers, Kyla - Nnamdi, Kojo - Sherwood, Tom - Musgrove, G. Derek - Richardson, Judy
    • Date: 2023-11-30
  • Film, Video
    Atomic Legacies The atomic bomb was born at Los Alamos, New Mexico, in 1945. Although the bomb inflicted its greatest violence on the civilian populations of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, its impact has since reached across the world, disproportionately affecting indigenous communities, colonial possessions and fragile ecosystems. Watch an interdisciplinary panel of scientists and scholars reflect on the global legacies of the atomic bomb.
    • Contributor: Barker, Holly M. - Morimoto, Ryo - Nako, Ila - Kattil-Debrum, Kalena - Charley, Perry H.
    • Date: 2023-08-01
  • Film, Video
    Patton's War, 1942-1944 Kevin Hymel has served as a historian and writer for the U.S. Army and U.S. Air Force for the last fifteen years and is a regular contributor to WWII History and WWII Quarterly. He is the author of a book based on Patton's photograph albums in the Library's collections. As a historian and tour guide for Stephen Ambrose Historical Tours, he has walked with...
    • Contributor: Hymel, Kevin - Wyman, Lewis - Kirby, Bruce - McAleer, Margaret
    • Date: 2023-07-13
  • Film, Video
    Eleanor Roosevelt, Robert Oppenheimer and UFOs In the late 1940s, reports of UFOs and "flying saucers" became an American cultural obsession. Movies such as "Invaders from Mars" (1953), "Earth vs. the Flying Saucers" (1956), and other popular media capitalized on the mainstream fascination. Even people like former first lady Eleanor Roosevelt were intrigued by the reports of flying saucers. After interviewing a pair of pilots on her television program who...
    • Contributor: Levy, Joshua
    • Date: 2023-07-07
  • Film, Video
    Saving Freud with Andrew Nagorski Historians Meg McAleer and Josh Levy discuss the founder of psychoanalysis Sigmund Freud's narrow escape from Nazi-controlled Vienna with Andrew Nagorski, author of the new book "Saving Freud: The Rescuers Who Brought Him to Freedom."
    • Contributor: Levy, Josh - Nagorski, Andrew - McAleer, Meg
    • Date: 2023-05-11
  • Film, Video
    Matthew Dallek: How the John Birch Society Radicalized the American Right A discussion with author Matthew Dallek about his forthcoming book, "Birchers: How the John Birch Society Radicalized the American Right". Dallek utilized over a half dozen collections from the Manuscript Division in his research, including Joseph and Stewart Alsop Papers, the David S. Broder Papers, the Arthur J. Finklestein Papers, the records of the NAACP, Joseph Rauh Papers, the William A. Rusher Papers, and...
    • Contributor: Dallek, Matthew - Cartledge, Connie - Reft, Ryan
    • Date: 2023-03-23
  • Film, Video
    Made at the Library: Author Michael Hill Discusses His Book "Funny Business" The program will trace the making of "Funny Business" from the acquisition and archival processing of the Art Buchwald Papers by the Manuscript Division to Hill's use of materials from the collection to craft his critically acclaimed book, which Seth Meyers has described as bringing "Buchwald's charming and zany career back to life." Made at the Library is an event series highlighting works inspired...
    • Contributor: Bair, Barbara - Benoit Kim, Colleen - Hill, Michael
    • Date: 2023-01-26
  • Film, Video
    Bruce Ragsdale's "Washington at the Plow" For Washington's birthday, join us for a conversation between Kluge Staff Fellow and historian Julie Miller and historian Bruce Ragsdale, whose recent book "Washington at the Plow: The Founding Farmer and the Question of Slavery" explores this relationship and draws on the George Washington Papers held by the Manuscript Division.
    • Contributor: Library of Congress. Manuscript Division - Library of Congress
    • Date: 2022
  • Film, Video
    Patsy Takemoto Mink: First Woman of Color in Congress In honor of Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage month, Judy Tzu-Chun Wu and Gwendolyn Mink join us to discuss their new biography of Congresswoman Mink, "Fierce and Fearless: Patsy Takemoto Mink, First Woman of Color in Congress". Wu is a professor of Asian American Studies and director of the Humanities Center at the University of California, Irvine. Gwendolyn Mink, Patsy's daughter, is a...
    • Contributor: Library of Congress. Manuscript Division - Library of Congress
    • Date: 2022
  • Film, Video
    Fifty Years of Watergate Panel Discussion June 17, 2022, marks the 50th anniversary of Watergate - a scandal that, to this day, remains a central aspect of American life and continues to define modern-day political controversy. Margaret Sullivan will moderate a discussion with Dwight Chapin, Leonard Downie Jr., Rick Perlstein, and Leah Wright Rigueur on the influence and importance of Watergate over these past five decades.
    • Contributor: Library of Congress. Manuscript Division - Library of Congress
    • Date: 2022
  • Film, Video
    Benjamin Franklin Butler: A Noisy, Fearless Life Long after his death in 1893, Benjamin Franklin Butler was remembered largely by caricatures: as "Beast Butler," the Yankee general who insulted the honor of white Southern women and purportedly stole silver spoons while in command of New Orleans in 1862; or as a political opportunist who changed parties frequently in order to advance his own ambitions. But how much does Butler's historical reputation...
    • Contributor: Library of Congress. Manuscript Division - Library of Congress
    • Date: 2022
  • Film, Video
    Propaganda War: The Committee on Public Information and World War John Maxwell Hamilton, Hopkins P. Breazeale LSU Foundation Professor of Journalism at Louisiana State University and a Senior Scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center in Washington, D.C. joins us to discuss his award-winning 2020 book, "Manipulating the Masses: Woodrow Wilson and the Birth of American Propaganda" and the issues it engages and the questions it asks about the role of journalism, government, and...
    • Contributor: Library of Congress. Manuscript Division - Library of Congress
    • Date: 2021
  • Film, Video
    Presidential Inauguration Date Change For 144 years, the U.S. President was inaugurated in the spring. But after the election of 1933, Congress changed the date in the 20th Amendment to the Constitution, moving the date up to Jan. 20. Library of Congress historian Michelle Krowl explains why.
    • Contributor: Library of Congress. Manuscript Division - Library of Congress
    • Date: 2021
  • Film, Video
    The Presidential Oath of Office Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden uses George Washington's autographed 1789 book that includes the Constitution to show the original wording of the incoming president's oath of office, and how Joe Biden will utter the same phrase 232 years later.
    • Contributor: Library of Congress. Manuscript Division - Library of Congress
    • Date: 2021
  • Film, Video
    Washington's First Inaugural Address, 1789 In 1789, the nation's first inauguration featured a surprise -- George Washington made a speech after taking the oath of office, although no one was expecting it. The inaugural address became an instant tradition. Julie Miller, the Library's early American historian, explains how Washington made history and precedent.
    • Contributor: Library of Congress. Manuscript Division - Library of Congress
    • Date: 2021
  • Film, Video
    Lincoln's Second Inaugural Address, 1865 Abraham Lincoln's second inaugural address in 1865 captured the nation's trauma over the Civil War and its hopes for the future. It is remembered by his immortal phrase, "with malice toward none, with charity for all." The Library's Civil War and Reconstruction historian Michelle Krowl explains how this speech came to be.
    • Contributor: Library of Congress. Manuscript Division - Library of Congress
    • Date: 2021
  • Film, Video
    Presidential Pets: Rebecca the Raccoon Mississippi supporters of Calvin Coolidge sent him a live raccoon for Thanksgiving dinner in 1926. Instead, first lady Grace Coolidge named it Rebecca and made it a family pet. Rebecca ran loose in the White House and escaped several times. She was a hit with the press and young children. Library historian Margaret McAleer tells the story.
    • Contributor: Library of Congress. Manuscript Division - Library of Congress
    • Date: 2021
  • Film, Video
    Presidential Pets: Pauline the Cow Pauline Wayne III was President William Howard Taft's celebrity cow. She grazed on the White House grounds. But en route to a guest appearance at a dairy show in Wisconsin, she went missing, setting off a comic turn of events. Library historian Margaret McAleer tells this charming tale.
    • Contributor: Library of Congress. Manuscript Division - Library of Congress
    • Date: 2021
  • Film, Video
    Lincoln's First Inaugural Address, 1861 Library of Congress historians Michelle Krowl and Chris Warren give a short guided tour of the documents and objects in our collections from Abraham Lincoln's first inaugural address. Highlights include his handwritten notes on his speech and Mary Todd Lincoln's pearls -- purchased on an installment plan at Tiffany's in New York by the president himself.
    • Contributor: Library of Congress. Manuscript Division - Library of Congress
    • Date: 2021
  • Film, Video
    Rediscovering Eleanor Roosevelt David Michaelis' new book "Eleanor" is a biography of America's longest-serving first lady. Much of its research was conducted in the Library's Manuscript Division, including the papers of the NAACP and the National Women's Trade League, as well as the personal papers of Kermit and Belle Roosevelt, Theodore Roosevelt Jr. and Edith Bolling Galt Wilson, second wife of President Wilson. Colleen Shogan, senior vice...
    • Contributor: Library of Congress. Manuscript Division - Library of Congress - Library of Congress. Center for the Book
    • Date: 2021
  • Film, Video
    Searching for Suffrage at the Library In honor of Women's History Month, Kimberly A. Hamlin discusses her new book, "Free Thinker: Sex, Suffrage and the Extraordinary Life of Helen Hamilton Gardener." The book details Gardener's life as a "fallen woman," who confronted restrictive social mores at an early age, and tracks her growing activism for women's rights that culminated in the passage of the 19th Amendment and her appointment by...
    • Contributor: Library of Congress. Manuscript Division - Library of Congress
    • Date: 2021
  • Film, Video
    Web Metrics Analysis of the Presidential Digital Collections The Manuscript Division holds the papers of twenty-three U.S. presidents. In 2020, the division completed their digitization, making all presidential papers accessible online. Rebekah Bain and Magdalene Jensen's 2021 Junior Fellows project included two parts: performing an analysis on the web metrics of the Jefferson and Grant presidential papers, and creating a LibGuide using content from the digitized presidential collections to help remote researchers...
    • Contributor: Library of Congress. Manuscript Division - Library of Congress
    • Date: 2021