Topic: Inaugurations

Library of Congress historians give short guided tours and descriptions of the documents and objects in our collections regarding various aspects of the presidential inauguration and its history.

  • Film, Video
    Presidential Inauguration Date Change For 144 years, the U.S. President was inaugurated in the spring. But after the election of 1933, Congress changed the date in the 20th Amendment to the Constitution, moving the date up to Jan. 20. Library of Congress historian Michelle Krowl explains why.
    • Contributor: Library of Congress. Manuscript Division - Library of Congress
    • Date: 2021
  • Film, Video
    Washington's First Inaugural Address, 1789 In 1789, the nation's first inauguration featured a surprise -- George Washington made a speech after taking the oath of office, although no one was expecting it. The inaugural address became an instant tradition. Julie Miller, the Library's early American historian, explains how Washington made history and precedent.
    • Contributor: Library of Congress. Manuscript Division - Library of Congress
    • Date: 2021
  • Film, Video
    Lincoln's First Inaugural Address, 1861 Library of Congress historians Michelle Krowl and Chris Warren give a short guided tour of the documents and objects in our collections from Abraham Lincoln's first inaugural address. Highlights include his handwritten notes on his speech and Mary Todd Lincoln's pearls -- purchased on an installment plan at Tiffany's in New York by the president himself.
    • Contributor: Library of Congress. Manuscript Division - Library of Congress
    • Date: 2021
  • Film, Video
    Lincoln's Second Inaugural Address, 1865 Abraham Lincoln's second inaugural address in 1865 captured the nation's trauma over the Civil War and its hopes for the future. It is remembered by his immortal phrase, "with malice toward none, with charity for all." The Library's Civil War and Reconstruction historian Michelle Krowl explains how this speech came to be.
    • Contributor: Library of Congress. Manuscript Division - Library of Congress
    • Date: 2021
  • Film, Video
    Presidential Pets: Pauline the Cow Pauline Wayne III was President William Howard Taft's celebrity cow. She grazed on the White House grounds. But en route to a guest appearance at a dairy show in Wisconsin, she went missing, setting off a comic turn of events. Library historian Margaret McAleer tells this charming tale.
    • Contributor: Library of Congress. Manuscript Division - Library of Congress
    • Date: 2021
  • Film, Video
    The Presidential Oath of Office Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden uses George Washington's autographed 1789 book that includes the Constitution to show the original wording of the incoming president's oath of office, and how Joe Biden will utter the same phrase 232 years later.
    • Contributor: Library of Congress. Manuscript Division - Library of Congress
    • Date: 2021
  • Film, Video
    Presidential Pets: Rebecca the Raccoon Mississippi supporters of Calvin Coolidge sent him a live raccoon for Thanksgiving dinner in 1926. Instead, first lady Grace Coolidge named it Rebecca and made it a family pet. Rebecca ran loose in the White House and escaped several times. She was a hit with the press and young children. Library historian Margaret McAleer tells the story.
    • Contributor: Library of Congress. Manuscript Division - Library of Congress
    • Date: 2021
  • Film, Video
    New Deal Resources: Preserving the Legacy, Part 1 The "New Deal" Franklin Delano Roosevelt had promised the American people began to take shape immediately after his inauguration on March 4, 1933. The multi-faceted social, cultural and fiscal recovery program aimed to reform and reinvigorate national life, and to end the Great Depression. Many New Deal administrators believed that art could be a part of the daily lives of all Americans, not just...
    • Date: 2008-03-13
  • Film, Video
    New Deal Resources: Preserving the Legacy, Part 2 The "New Deal" Franklin Delano Roosevelt had promised the American people began to take shape immediately after his inauguration on March 4, 1933. The multi-faceted social, cultural and fiscal recovery program aimed to reform and reinvigorate national life, and to end the Great Depression. Many New Deal administrators believed that art could be a part of the daily lives of all Americans, not just...
    • Date: 2008-03-13
  • Film, Video
    The New Deal Legacy and Contemporary Scholarship, Part 1. The "New Deal" Franklin Delano Roosevelt had promised the American people began to take shape immediately after his inauguration on March 4, 1933. The multi-faceted social, cultural and fiscal recovery program aimed to reform and reinvigorate national life, and to end the Great Depression. Many New Deal administrators believed that art could be a part of the daily lives of all Americans, not just...
    • Contributor: Library of Congress. Prints and Photographs Division - Library of Congress. National Audio-Visual Conservation Center - Library of Congress. Manuscript Division - Library of Congress. Music Division - John W. Kluge Center (Library of Congress) - American Folklife Center - Library of Congress. Center for the Book - Library of Congress
    • Date: 2008
  • Film, Video
    The New Deal Legacy and Contemporary Scholarship, Part 2. The "New Deal" Franklin Delano Roosevelt had promised the American people began to take shape immediately after his inauguration on March 4, 1933. The multi-faceted social, cultural and fiscal recovery program aimed to reform and reinvigorate national life, and to end the Great Depression. Many New Deal administrators believed that art could be a part of the daily lives of all Americans, not just...
    • Contributor: Library of Congress. Prints and Photographs Division - Library of Congress. National Audio-Visual Conservation Center - Library of Congress. Manuscript Division - Library of Congress. Music Division - John W. Kluge Center (Library of Congress) - American Folklife Center - Library of Congress. Center for the Book - Library of Congress
    • Date: 2008
  • Film, Video
    Propaganda War: The Committee on Public Information and World War John Maxwell Hamilton, Hopkins P. Breazeale LSU Foundation Professor of Journalism at Louisiana State University and a Senior Scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center in Washington, D.C. joins us to discuss his award-winning 2020 book, "Manipulating the Masses: Woodrow Wilson and the Birth of American Propaganda" and the issues it engages and the questions it asks about the role of journalism, government, and...
    • Contributor: Library of Congress. Manuscript Division - Library of Congress
    • Date: 2021
  • Film, Video
    Ellen & Edith: Woodrow Wilson's First Ladies The wives of Woodrow Wilson were strikingly different from each other. Ellen Axson Wilson, quiet and intellectual, died after just a year and a half in the White House and is thought to have had little impact on history. Edith Bolling Wilson was flamboyant and confident but left a legacy of controversy. Kristie Miller discusses them, the subject of her new book.
    • Contributor: Library of Congress. Center for the Book - Library of Congress. Manuscript Division - Library of Congress
    • Date: 2011
  • Film, Video
    Impeached: the Trial of President Andrew Johnson and the Fight for Lincoln's Legacy After Abraham Lincoln's assassination, the United States continued to tumble through tumultuous times. President Andrew Johnson was failing to heal the nation's wounds, and the bitter political environment culminated in an impeachment trial. David O. Stewart discussed Johnson's 1868 trial, when once again the nation's fate hung in the balance.
    • Contributor: Library of Congress. Researcher and Reference Services Division - Library of Congress. Manuscript Division - Library of Congress
    • Date: 2009
  • Film, Video
    Searching for Suffrage at the Library In honor of Women's History Month, Kimberly A. Hamlin discusses her new book, "Free Thinker: Sex, Suffrage and the Extraordinary Life of Helen Hamilton Gardener." The book details Gardener's life as a "fallen woman," who confronted restrictive social mores at an early age, and tracks her growing activism for women's rights that culminated in the passage of the 19th Amendment and her appointment by...
    • Contributor: Library of Congress. Manuscript Division - Library of Congress
    • Date: 2021
  • Film, Video
    Fifty Years of Watergate Panel Discussion June 17, 2022, marks the 50th anniversary of Watergate - a scandal that, to this day, remains a central aspect of American life and continues to define modern-day political controversy. Margaret Sullivan will moderate a discussion with Dwight Chapin, Leonard Downie Jr., Rick Perlstein, and Leah Wright Rigueur on the influence and importance of Watergate over these past five decades.
    • Contributor: Library of Congress. Manuscript Division - Library of Congress
    • Date: 2022