Made At the Library

Made at the Library is an event series highlighting works inspired by and emerging from research at the Library of Congress. Featuring authors, artists, and other creators in conversation with Library experts, this series takes a deep dive into the process of working with Library’s collections.

  • Film, Video
    Made at the Library: Author Michael Hill Discusses His Book "Funny Business" The program will trace the making of "Funny Business" from the acquisition and archival processing of the Art Buchwald Papers by the Manuscript Division to Hill's use of materials from the collection to craft his critically acclaimed book, which Seth Meyers has described as bringing "Buchwald's charming and zany career back to life." Made at the Library is an event series highlighting works inspired...
    • Contributor: Hill, Michael - Bair, Barbara - Benoit Kim, Colleen
    • Date: 2023-01-26
  • Film, Video
    Made at the Library: The Chemistry of Fear with Jonathan Rees Watch a conversation with author Jonathan Rees about his recent biography of controversial pure food crusader and influential USDA chemist Harvey Washington Wiley, "The Chemistry of Fear: Harvey Wiley's Fight for Pure Food" (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2021). The book examines Wiley's many - and varied - clashes over food safety, and reveals that his impact on what Americans are often depended more upon...
    • Contributor: Rees, Jonathan - Szypszak, Lara - Levy, Josh
    • Date: 2022-11-02
  • Film, Video
    Cassandra Good and George Washington's Heirs George Washington is widely known to have had no biological children of his own. Less well known is his role in raising several of the children and grandchildren of Martha Washington's marriage to her first husband, Daniel Parke Custis. In this informal conversation with the Library's Julie Miller, Cassandra Good, author of "First Family: George Washington's Heirs and the Making of America," discussed her...
    • Contributor: Good, Cassandra
    • Date: 2024-04-30
  • Film, Video
    Making Mexican Chicago Mike Amezcua is a historian and a professor in Georgetown University's Department of History. His 2022 work, "Making Mexican Chicago: From Postwar Settlement to the Age of Gentrification" explores the growth of Chicago's Mexican/Mexican-American community, its fight for political and cultural recognition, and its battles with gentrification. Amezcua utilized several collections from the Manuscript Division, including the records of the Work Projects Administration and...
    • Contributor: Reft, Ryan - Amezcua, Mike - Deaver, Loretta
    • Date: 2023-06-28
  • Film, Video
    Goldwater v. Carter: Foreign Policy, China, and the Resurgence of Executive Branch What role does the judiciary play in foreign policy and how does it relate to the legislative and executive branches is a central question in Joshua Kastenberg's new book, "Goldwater v. Nixon: Foreign Policy, China, and the Resurgence of Executive Branch Primacy." While the Supreme Court ultimately upheld President Jimmy Carter's unilateral nullification of the Sino-American Mutual Defense Treaty with the Republic of China...
    • Contributor: Reft, Ryan - Cartledge, Connie - Kastenberg, Joshua
    • Date: 2023-10-19
  • Film, Video
    Scandal and Intrigue in 1920s America When Harry Daugherty secured a federal court injunction against a burgeoning nationwide railroad strike in September of 1922, little did the sitting attorney general realize the series of events he set into motion. In Montana, the state's soon-to-be-elected populist senator Burton Wheeler set his sights on Daugherty -- first using him as a whipping post for his election to the Senate, then later seeking...
    • Contributor: Masters, Nathan
    • Date: 2023-08-23
  • Film, Video
    Saving Freud with Andrew Nagorski Historians Meg McAleer and Josh Levy discuss the founder of psychoanalysis Sigmund Freud's narrow escape from Nazi-controlled Vienna with Andrew Nagorski, author of the new book "Saving Freud: The Rescuers Who Brought Him to Freedom."
    • Contributor: Nagorski, Andrew - Levy, Josh - McAleer, Meg
    • Date: 2023-05-11
  • Film, Video
    Matthew Dallek: How the John Birch Society Radicalized the American Right A discussion with author Matthew Dallek about his forthcoming book, "Birchers: How the John Birch Society Radicalized the American Right". Dallek utilized over a half dozen collections from the Manuscript Division in his research, including Joseph and Stewart Alsop Papers, the David S. Broder Papers, the Arthur J. Finklestein Papers, the records of the NAACP, Joseph Rauh Papers, the William A. Rusher Papers, and...
    • Contributor: Reft, Ryan - Cartledge, Connie - Dallek, Matthew
    • Date: 2023-03-23
  • Film, Video
    Patton's War, 1942-1944 Kevin Hymel has served as a historian and writer for the U.S. Army and U.S. Air Force for the last fifteen years and is a regular contributor to WWII History and WWII Quarterly. He is the author of a book based on Patton's photograph albums in the Library's collections. As a historian and tour guide for Stephen Ambrose Historical Tours, he has walked with...
    • Contributor: Hymel, Kevin - Kirby, Bruce - McAleer, Margaret - Wyman, Lewis
    • Date: 2023-07-13
  • Film, Video
    Eliza Scidmore, Trailblazing Journalist In celebration of Women's History Month, join author Diana P. Parsell as she discusses her recent book "Eliza Scidmore: The Trailblazing Journalist Behind Washington's Cherry Trees" with Library specialists Elizabeth A. Novara and Mari Nakahara.
    • Contributor: Nakahara, Mari - Parsell, Diana P. - Novara, Elizabeth
    • Date: 2024-03-05
  • Film, Video
    Ralph Ellison: Photographer This webinar celebrates Ralph Ellison's creativity and observation of African American life through discussion of Michal Raz-Russo and John F. Callahan's collaboratively created book "Ralph Ellison: Photographer." The book uses select photographs and historical documents from Ellison collections at the Library of Congress to explore Ellison (1913-1994) as a personal and professional freelance photographer, revealing an artistic side of Ellison that is not widely...
    • Contributor: Callahan, John F. - Raz-Russo, Michal
    • Date: 2024-02-08
  • Film, Video
    Bruce Ragsdale's "Washington at the Plow" For Washington's birthday, join us for a conversation between Kluge Staff Fellow and historian Julie Miller and historian Bruce Ragsdale, whose recent book "Washington at the Plow: The Founding Farmer and the Question of Slavery" explores this relationship and draws on the George Washington Papers held by the Manuscript Division.
    • Contributor: Library of Congress. Manuscript Division - Library of Congress
    • Date: 2022
  • Film, Video
    Patsy Takemoto Mink: First Woman of Color in Congress In honor of Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage month, Judy Tzu-Chun Wu and Gwendolyn Mink join us to discuss their new biography of Congresswoman Mink, "Fierce and Fearless: Patsy Takemoto Mink, First Woman of Color in Congress". Wu is a professor of Asian American Studies and director of the Humanities Center at the University of California, Irvine. Gwendolyn Mink, Patsy's daughter, is a...
    • Contributor: Library of Congress. Manuscript Division - Library of Congress
    • Date: 2022
  • Film, Video
    Benjamin Franklin Butler: A Noisy, Fearless Life Long after his death in 1893, Benjamin Franklin Butler was remembered largely by caricatures: as "Beast Butler," the Yankee general who insulted the honor of white Southern women and purportedly stole silver spoons while in command of New Orleans in 1862; or as a political opportunist who changed parties frequently in order to advance his own ambitions. But how much does Butler's historical reputation...
    • Contributor: Library of Congress. Manuscript Division - Library of Congress
    • Date: 2022
  • Film, Video
    Propaganda War: The Committee on Public Information and World War John Maxwell Hamilton, Hopkins P. Breazeale LSU Foundation Professor of Journalism at Louisiana State University and a Senior Scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center in Washington, D.C. joins us to discuss his award-winning 2020 book, "Manipulating the Masses: Woodrow Wilson and the Birth of American Propaganda" and the issues it engages and the questions it asks about the role of journalism, government, and...
    • Contributor: Library of Congress. Manuscript Division - Library of Congress
    • Date: 2021
  • Film, Video
    Rediscovering Eleanor Roosevelt David Michaelis' new book "Eleanor" is a biography of America's longest-serving first lady. Much of its research was conducted in the Library's Manuscript Division, including the papers of the NAACP and the National Women's Trade League, as well as the personal papers of Kermit and Belle Roosevelt, Theodore Roosevelt Jr. and Edith Bolling Galt Wilson, second wife of President Wilson. Colleen Shogan, senior vice...
    • Contributor: Library of Congress. Manuscript Division - Library of Congress. Center for the Book - Library of Congress
    • Date: 2021