Book/Printed Material Image 104 of East Germany : a country study

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East Germany: A Country Studythe war, population has declined steadily, posing a serious problem for East German planners interested in balanced economic growth and social development. The population reached a peak of 19.1 million in 1948. This postwar increase resulted largely from the influx of Germans expelled from Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union. After 1950, however, the population began to decline and, except for a small increase in the early 1960s (after the construc- tion of the Berlin Wall), the country continued to register a nega- tive growth rate. In 1950 the official census recorded a resident population of 18.3 million; by 1960 the number had dropped to 17.2 million; and by 1970 it had decreased to 17.1 million. Popu- lation levelled off in the late 1970s at around 16.7 million, reflect- ing a zero rate of growth.Historical TrendsThe population pyramids of both East Germany and West Ger- many have reflected casualties suffered during two world wars, lower birthrates in the prewar and postwar periods, and the large-scale movement of population in the ten to fifteen years after World War II. East Germany, however, has felt these negative effects more severely than West Germany and has taken a longer time to recover from them.The number of German military and civilian deaths resulting from World War II is estimated at between 3.5 and 4.5 million. Most of the casualties were in the twenty-to-forty-four age group, and most of these were men in their thirties. The ratio of women to men was five to four in 1950. The surplus of females was espe- cially marked in the twenty-one-to-thirty-five age group, where women outnumbered men by more than two to one. The net result was a decline in marriage and birthrates, an increase in the death rate, and an increase in the proportion of the population over forty- five years of age.Compounding the problem was an influx of Germans from Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union and an equally dramatic flow of refugees from East Germany to West Germany. An estimated 11.7 million ethnic Germans were expelled from the Soviet Union, Poland, Czechoslovakia, Austria, Hungary, Yugoslavia, and Romania between 1945 and 1960. Most were transferred in the first two years after the war, and most were channeled initially into the Soviet zone, although only an estimated 2.2 million finally set- tled there. In the late 1940s, the number of expellees offset the decline in the resident population because of war losses, and the total population increased by 14 percent.66

About this Item

Title
East Germany : a country study
Contributor Names
Burant, Stephen R., 1954-
Library of Congress. Federal Research Division.
Created / Published
Washington, D.C. : Federal Research Division, Library of Congress : For sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S. G.P.O., 1988.
Subject Headings
-  Germany (East)
Notes
-  "Research completed July 1987."
-  Supercedes the 1982 ed. of East Germany : a country study, edited by Eugene K. Keefe.
-  Includes bibliographical references (p. 381-411) and index.
-  Also available in digital form.
Medium
xxxiii, 433 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Call Number/Physical Location
DD280.6 .E22 1988
Library of Congress Control Number
87600490
Language
English
Online Format
image
online text
pdf
Description
"Research completed July 1987." Supercedes the 1982 ed. of East Germany : a country study, edited by Eugene K. Keefe. Includes bibliographical references (p. 381-411) and index. Also available in digital form.
LCCN Permalink
https://lccn.loc.gov/87600490
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Sample format for citing a Country Study:

Metz, Helen Chapin, ed. Turkey:  A Country Study. Washington, DC: GPO for the Library of Congress, 1996.

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Citations are generated automatically from bibliographic data as a convenience, and may not be complete or accurate.

Chicago citation style:

Burant, Stephen R, and Library Of Congress. Federal Research Division. East Germany: a country study. Washington, D.C.: Federal Research Division, Library of Congress: For sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S. G.P.O, 1988. Pdf. https://www.loc.gov/item/87600490/.

APA citation style:

Burant, S. R. & Library Of Congress. Federal Research Division. (1988) East Germany: a country study. Washington, D.C.: Federal Research Division, Library of Congress: For sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S. G.P.O. [Pdf] Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/87600490/.

MLA citation style:

Burant, Stephen R, and Library Of Congress. Federal Research Division. East Germany: a country study. Washington, D.C.: Federal Research Division, Library of Congress: For sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S. G.P.O, 1988. Pdf. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, <www.loc.gov/item/87600490/>.

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