Photo, Print, Drawing Bush Stadium - Bush Stadium and the Landscape of Black Baseball in Indianapolis, Indiana - Bush Stadium, 1501 West 16th Street, Indianapolis, Marion County, IN Drawings from Survey HALS IN-6

About this Item

About this Item

Title
Bush Stadium, 1501 West 16th Street, Indianapolis, Marion County, IN
Contributor Names
Historic American Landscapes Survey, creator
ABCs
American Giants
Athletics
Crawfords
The Indianapolis Clowns
Perry, Norman
Bush, Owen "Donie"
Indianapolis Power and Light Company (IPL)
Perry, Jim
Pierre and White
Osborn Engineering Company
Negro National League
Negro Leagues
Stevens, Chris, transmitter
Baas, R. Christopher, faculty sponsor
Strecker, Geralyn M., faculty sponsor
Created / Published
Documentation compiled after 2000
Subject Headings
-  African Americans
-  athletic fields
-  baseball
-  segregation
-  stadiums
-  Art Deco architectural elements
-  Indiana -- Marion County -- Indianapolis
Latitude / Longitude
39.787824,-86.188837
Notes
-  Entry and Second Place Recipient 2011 HALS Challenge: Celebrating Cultural Landscapes of Diversity
-  Significance: Bush Stadium contributes to the broad patterns of history in the area of recreation because of its association with baseball in Indianapolis during the 20th century. Bush Stadium was constructed in 1931 to host Indianapolis's Minor League team, the Indianapolis Indians. Prior to being renamed Bush Stadium, the ballpark was first known as Perry Stadium and then Victory Field. It served as a significant venue for both segregated and integrated baseball. Through the 1930s, different Negro League teams played at Perry Stadium, including the ABCs (1932, 1938, 1939), American Giants (1933), Athletics (1937), and Crawfords (1940). The Indianapolis Clowns played there from 1944 to 1962. The Indianapolis Indians integrated in 1952. Bush Stadium is also significant for its association with the lives of Norman Perry and Owen "Donie" Bush, both contributors in naming the stadium. The Perry family operated the Indianapolis Power and Light Company (IPL), which was adjacent to the stadium that predated Bush, Washington Park. IPL supplied the light towers at Washington Park, and they were moved to Bush Stadium in 1932. Jim Perry, Norman's brother, owned the Indianapolis Indians, but suffered a fatal accident in 1929. Norman took over as the team owner, constructed the new ballpark, and named it "Perry Stadium" in honor of his brother. The "PS" in the bas-relief carvings symbolizes the stadium's original name. Indianapolis native Owen "Donie" Bush played professional baseball for the Detroit Tigers for fifteen years (1908-1922) and later managed four professional teams. Throughout his career, he would round up major and minor leaguers to play against the Indianapolis ABCs during the postseason. This was an annual highlight for many Indianapolis baseball fans. In 1967, the stadium was renamed "Bush Stadium" in honor of Bush and his contributions to Indianapolis baseball. Bush Stadium is also significant for its architectural style and innovative design and construction. Bush Stadium is a classic steel and reinforced concrete ballpark. After visiting the newly constructed stadium, Thomas Hickey, president of the American Baseball Association, stated that Bush was the finest ballpark ever, when compared to other league parks. The local architecture firm of Pierre and White designed the beauty in Bush Stadium while Osborn Engineering Company ensured that it was structurally sound. Pierre and White were well known among Indianapolis circles for their trademark Art Deco designs. The gate pavilion with its large bas-relief carvings sparked interest in this firm, which went on to design a number of other significant buildings in Indianapolis such as the Indiana State Library and Historical Building. The Osborn Engineering Company of Cleveland, Ohio, was well known for building other significant steel and reinforced concrete ballparks such as Detroit's Tiger Stadium, the Bronx's Yankee Stadium, and the reconstruction of Boston's Fenway Park. The design of Bush Stadium was well ahead of its time due to its many modern amenities for fans, players, and officials. Tunnels between the dugout and locker rooms kept players separate from the fans and umpires. Spectators enjoyed raised seat heights and lights for night games. On the second floor of the gate pavilion, team managers had offices, a kitchen, and dining rooms with fireplaces. The entire structure of the gate pavilion and grandstands opened up to a large playing field, with the right and left field walls 350 feet away from home plate. Bush Stadium was also the first ballpark in Indianapolis to be surrounded by large amounts of parking. Subsequently, many fans traveling to and from the ballpark drove through the surrounding African American community.
-  Survey number: HALS IN-6
-  Building/structure dates: ca. 1967 Subsequent Work
-  Building/structure dates: ca. 1931 Initial Construction
-  Building/structure dates: ca. 1931 Initial Construction
-  National Register of Historic Places NRIS Number: 95000703
Medium
Measured Drawing(s): 4
Data Page(s): 14
Call Number/Physical Location
HALS IN-6
Source Collection
Historic American Landscapes Survey (Library of Congress)
Repository
Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print
Control Number
in0534
Rights Advisory
No known restrictions on images made by the U.S. Government; images copied from other sources may be restricted. https://www.loc.gov/rr/print/res/114_habs.html
Language
English
Online Format
image
pdf
Description
Measured Drawing(s): 4 | Data Page(s): 14

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  • Call Number: HALS IN-6
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Cite This Item

Citations are generated automatically from bibliographic data as a convenience, and may not be complete or accurate.

Chicago citation style:

Historic American Landscapes Survey, Creator, Abcs, American Giants, Athletics, Crawfords, The Indianapolis Clowns, Norman Perry, et al. Bush Stadium,West 16th Street, Indianapolis, Marion County, IN. Indiana Indianapolis Marion County, 2000. Documentation Compiled After. Photograph. https://www.loc.gov/item/in0534/.

APA citation style:

Historic American Landscapes Survey, C., Abcs, American Giants, Athletics, Crawfords, The Indianapolis Clowns [...] Strecker, G. M. (2000) Bush Stadium,West 16th Street, Indianapolis, Marion County, IN. Indiana Indianapolis Marion County, 2000. Documentation Compiled After. [Photograph] Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/in0534/.

MLA citation style:

Historic American Landscapes Survey, Creator, et al. Bush Stadium,West 16th Street, Indianapolis, Marion County, IN. Documentation Compiled After. Photograph. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, <www.loc.gov/item/in0534/>.

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