Photo, Print, Drawing Perspective view (duplicate of MD-1109-J-4) - National Park Seminary, Japanese Pagoda, 2805 Linden Lane, Silver Spring, Montgomery County, MD Photos from Survey HABS MD-1109-J

About this Item

About this Item

Title
National Park Seminary, Japanese Pagoda, 2805 Linden Lane, Silver Spring, Montgomery County, MD
Contributor Names
Historic American Buildings Survey, creator
Chi Psi Epsilon sorority
Price, Virginia B, transmitter
Ott, Cynthia, historian
Boucher, Jack E, photographer
Price, Virginia B, transmitter
Lavoie, Catherine C, project manager
Created / Published
Documentation compiled after 1933
Subject Headings
-  pagodas
-  sorority houses
-  officers' quarters
-  fraternities & sororities
-  women
-  education
-  adaptive reuse
-  domestic life
-  military medicine
-  tea rooms
-  shoji
-  Maryland -- Montgomery County -- Silver Spring
Latitude / Longitude
39.011741,-77.057609
Notes
-  Significance: The Japanese pagoda is one of the landmark campus buildings. Even before its upturned eaves were removed, the Japanese bungalow looked austere compared to this ostentatious structure next door. Instead of simply incorporating Japanese detailing on an American house design, the pagoda resembles a Japanese temple. It is one of the most flamboyant and ornamental of any of the campus structures. The building was one of eight clubhouses built on campus. It was the sorority house for Chi Psi Epsilon. The pagoda was not a rare form of garden and suburban architecture. The building type appeared in many estate gardens and in many suburban neighborhoods. Only one other girls school was located that had a Japanese-inspired building on campus, however, Traces of a Japanese design are barely legible in the Ransom Everglades School's meeting house, located in Coconut Grove, Florida. It is not nearly as provocative as the pagoda at NPS. Since the eighteenth century, wealthy English and American estate owners have erected Asian-inspired houses and follies on their grounds. Asian designs became popular with Americans after trade with China was established in the eighteenth century. The reopening of trade with Japan in the 1850s after years of isolation, the publication of Edward Morse's "Japanese Houses and Their Surroundings" in 1885, and the exhibition of Japanese houses at World Fairs, all contributed to the popularity of Japanese goods and designs around the turn of the twentieth century. Exotic forms, in this case, Asian, were intended to reflect the owner's sophistication and refinement. Many wealthy Americans had Japanese rooms in their houses and less affluent ones purchased Japanese wares. Because of its size and ostentatious design, the pagoda looks more like a garden folly than a dwelling house. A wide assortment of exotic Japanese buildings were designed as enticing eye-catchers in many country estate gardens. Some were placed within picturesque English-style landscapes and others were a part of a larger Japanese garden design. Japanese architects were responsible for many works, but pattern books were also available for American builders' use. The NPS pagoda was probably a result of the latter. Because the pagoda is closely situated between several eclectic buildings instead of in a natural garden setting, it is slightly out of context for a garden folly and somewhat more like an amusement park attraction.
-  Survey number: HABS MD-1109-J
-  Building/structure dates: 1907 Initial Construction
-  Building/structure dates: 1919-1923 Subsequent Work
Medium
Photo(s): 17
Color Transparencies: 2
Data Page(s): 5
Photo Caption Page(s): 2
Call Number/Physical Location
HABS MD,16-SILSPR,2J-
Source Collection
Historic American Buildings Survey (Library of Congress)
Repository
Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print
Control Number
md1513
Rights Advisory
No known restrictions on images made by the U.S. Government; images copied from other sources may be restricted. https://www.loc.gov/rr/print/res/114_habs.html
Online Format
image
pdf

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Cite This Item

Citations are generated automatically from bibliographic data as a convenience, and may not be complete or accurate.

Chicago citation style:

Historic American Buildings Survey, Creator, Chi Psi Epsilon Sorority, Cynthia Ott, and Catherine C Lavoie, Boucher, Jack E, photographer. National Park Seminary, Japanese Pagoda,Linden Lane, Silver Spring, Montgomery County, MD. Maryland Silver Spring Montgomery County, 1933. translateds by Price, Virginia Bmitter, and Price, Virginia Bmitter Documentation Compiled After. Photograph. https://www.loc.gov/item/md1513/.

APA citation style:

Historic American Buildings Survey, C., Chi Psi Epsilon Sorority, Ott, C. & Lavoie, C. C., Boucher, J. E., photographer. (1933) National Park Seminary, Japanese Pagoda,Linden Lane, Silver Spring, Montgomery County, MD. Maryland Silver Spring Montgomery County, 1933. Price, V. B. & Price, V. B., transs Documentation Compiled After. [Photograph] Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/md1513/.

MLA citation style:

Historic American Buildings Survey, Creator, et al., photographer by Boucher, Jack E. National Park Seminary, Japanese Pagoda,Linden Lane, Silver Spring, Montgomery County, MD. trans by Price, Virginia Bmitter, and Price, Virginia Bmitter Documentation Compiled After. Photograph. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, <www.loc.gov/item/md1513/>.

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