Book/Printed Material Narrative of Sojourner Truth; a bondswoman of olden time, emancipated by the New York Legislature in the early part of the present century; with a history of her labors and correspondence drawn from her "Book of life." General Collections copy

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  • Image 1 of General Collections copy
    Sojourner Truth's narrative and Book of life
    SOJOURNER TRUTH'S NARRATIVE AND BOOK OF LIFE.
    • Contributor: Titus, Frances W. - Gilbert, Olive - Susan Anthony Collection (Library of Congress)
    • Date: 1878
  • Image 2 of General Collections copy
    Sojourner Truth's narrative and Book of life
    Sojourner Truth, “THE LIBYAN SIBYL.”
    • Contributor: Titus, Frances W. - Gilbert, Olive - Susan Anthony Collection (Library of Congress)
    • Date: 1878
  • Image 3 of General Collections copy
    Sojourner Truth's narrative and Book of life
    (Olive Gilbert) NARRATIVE of SOJOURNER TRUTH; A Bondswoman of Olden Time, Emancipated by the New York Legislature in the Early Part of the Present Century: WITH A HISTORY OF HER LABORS AND CORRESPONDENCE DRAWN FROM HER ” BOOK OF LIFE.” BATTLE CREEK, MICH.: PUBLISHED FOR THE AUTHOR. 1878.
    • Contributor: Titus, Frances W. - Gilbert, Olive - Susan Anthony Collection (Library of Congress)
    • Date: 1878
  • Image 4 of General Collections copy
    Sojourner Truth's narrative and Book of life
    E185 .97 .T875 Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1875, By Mrs. FRANCES W. TITUS, In the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington. American University By JUL 20 1929 29-25244
    • Contributor: Titus, Frances W. - Gilbert, Olive - Susan Anthony Collection (Library of Congress)
    • Date: 1878
  • Image 5 of General Collections copy
    Sojourner Truth's narrative and Book of life
    v A PREFACE WHICH WAS INTENDED FOR A POSTSCRIPT. Sojourner Truth once remarked, in reply to an allusion to the late Horace Greeley, “You call him a self-made man; well, I am a self-made woman.” The world is ever ready to sound the praises of the so-called self-made men; i. e., those men who in the full possession of freedom, lacking nothing but wealth,...
    • Contributor: Titus, Frances W. - Gilbert, Olive - Susan Anthony Collection (Library of Congress)
    • Date: 1878
  • Image 6 of General Collections copy
    Sojourner Truth's narrative and Book of life
    vi In the autumn of 1876, a report of her decease was widely circulated. How this occurred we know not. Possibly, because her twin sister, the Century, had just expired. No prayers addressed, or oblations poured out to the gods, could induce them to grant it an extra hour. But Sojourner grandly outrode the storm which wrecked the Century. Her mind is as clear...
    • Contributor: Titus, Frances W. - Gilbert, Olive - Susan Anthony Collection (Library of Congress)
    • Date: 1878
  • Image 7 of General Collections copy
    Sojourner Truth's narrative and Book of life
    vii there. “God was not dead,” and in looking back to the Egypt of their captivity, Sojourner sees that her people have been guided through the dark wilderness of oppression by the “pillar of cloud and of fire.” Her race now stands on the Pisgah of freedom, looking into the promised land, where the culture which has so long been denied them can, by...
    • Contributor: Titus, Frances W. - Gilbert, Olive - Susan Anthony Collection (Library of Congress)
    • Date: 1878
  • Image 8 of General Collections copy
    Sojourner Truth's narrative and Book of life
    viii the famous women of these famous times, covering in her own experience the emancipation era, from the declaration of New York in 1817, to Abraham Lincoln's proclamation, he deserves especial honor. The nation could rightfully grant her a pension for her services in the war, no less than for her labors since the war for the amelioration of those yet half enslaved.” The...
    • Contributor: Titus, Frances W. - Gilbert, Olive - Susan Anthony Collection (Library of Congress)
    • Date: 1878
  • Image 9 of General Collections copy
    Sojourner Truth's narrative and Book of life
    ix thankfulness, to have realized that indeed it is ‘more blessed to give than to receive.’ “As we opened the letters, one by one, and read the words of sweet remembrance and kindness, she was quite overcome with joy, and more than once gave utterance to her feelings through her tears; praising the Lord who had so soon answered her prayer, which was, in...
    • Contributor: Titus, Frances W. - Gilbert, Olive - Susan Anthony Collection (Library of Congress)
    • Date: 1878
  • Image 10 of General Collections copy
    Sojourner Truth's narrative and Book of life
    x hadn't sent a penny, his words would feed my soul, and dat is what we all want.’ Then she mentioned Samuel Hill, of Northampton, Mass., where she lived fifteen years, saying that his noble, generous heart had done a great deal for her. Ofttimes the ecstasy of her soul would gush forth in all its original vigor and freshness at the thought of...
    • Contributor: Titus, Frances W. - Gilbert, Olive - Susan Anthony Collection (Library of Congress)
    • Date: 1878
  • Image 11 of General Collections copy
    Sojourner Truth's narrative and Book of life
    xi dey don't know God, nor God don't know dem.’ I never hear her speak with greater force and power than she did the other day when some friends called to see her. She says this is all the way she has now to preach. She often speaks of T. W. Higginson and Frances D. Gage—thinks ‘dey are appointed of God to fill de...
    • Contributor: Titus, Frances W. - Gilbert, Olive - Susan Anthony Collection (Library of Congress)
    • Date: 1878
  • Image 12 of General Collections copy
    Sojourner Truth's narrative and Book of life
    xii Now, in 1878, she oversees her own household matters, and often gives three public lectures in a week. Within the past year, she has held meetings in thirty-six towns in Michigan. Her health is good; her eye-sight, for many years defective, has returned. Her gray locks are being succeeded by a luxuriant growth of black hair, without the use of any other renovator...
    • Contributor: Titus, Frances W. - Gilbert, Olive - Susan Anthony Collection (Library of Congress)
    • Date: 1878
  • Image 13 of General Collections copy
    Sojourner Truth's narrative and Book of life
    NARRATIVE of SOJOURNER TRUTH. HER BIRTH AND PARENTAGE. The subject of this biography, Sojourner Truth , as she now calls herself—but whose name, originally, was Isabella—was born, as near as she can now calculate, between the years 1797 and 1800. She was the daughter of James and Betsey, slaves of one Colonel Ardinburgh, Hurley, Ulster County, New York. Colonel Ardinburgh belonged to that class...
    • Contributor: Titus, Frances W. - Gilbert, Olive - Susan Anthony Collection (Library of Congress)
    • Date: 1878
  • Image 14 of General Collections copy
    Sojourner Truth's narrative and Book of life
    14 received from him particular favors—among which was a lot of land, lying back on the slope of a mountain, where, by improving the pleasant evenings and Sundays, they managed to raise a little tobacco, corn, or flax; which they exchanged for extras, in the articles of food or clothing for themselves and children. She has no remembrance that Saturday afternoon was ever added...
    • Contributor: Titus, Frances W. - Gilbert, Olive - Susan Anthony Collection (Library of Congress)
    • Date: 1878
  • Image 15 of General Collections copy
    Sojourner Truth's narrative and Book of life
    15 Still, she does not attribute this cruelty—for cruelty it certainly is, to be so unmindful of the health and comfort of any being, leaving entirely out of sight his more important part, his everlasting interests,—so much to any innate or constitutional cruelty of the master, as to that gigantic inconsistency, that inherited habit among slaveholders, of expecting a willing and intelligent obedience from...
    • Contributor: Titus, Frances W. - Gilbert, Olive - Susan Anthony Collection (Library of Congress)
    • Date: 1878
  • Image 16 of General Collections copy
    Sojourner Truth's narrative and Book of life
    16 as she did, while Bomefree and Mau-mau Bett,—their dark cellar lighted by a blazing pine-knot,—would sit for hours, recalling and recounting every endearing, as well as harrowing circumstance that taxed memory could supply, from the histories of those dear departed ones, of whom they had been robbed, and for whom their hearts still bled. Among the rest, they would relate how the little...
    • Contributor: Titus, Frances W. - Gilbert, Olive - Susan Anthony Collection (Library of Congress)
    • Date: 1878
  • Image 17 of General Collections copy
    Sojourner Truth's narrative and Book of life
    17 HER RELIGIOUS INSTRUCTION. Isabella and Peter, her youngest brother, remained, with their parents, the legal property of Charles Ardinburgh till his decease, which took place when Isabella was near nine years old. After this event, she was often surprised to find her mother in tears; and when, in her simplicity; she inquired, ‘Mau-mau, what makes you cry?’ she would answer, ‘Oh, my child,...
    • Contributor: Titus, Frances W. - Gilbert, Olive - Susan Anthony Collection (Library of Congress)
    • Date: 1878
  • Image 18 of General Collections copy
    Sojourner Truth's narrative and Book of life
    18 break cut in the language of the Psalmist—‘Oh Lord, how long?’ ‘Oh Lord, how long?” And in reply to Isabella's question—‘What ails you, mau-mau?’ her only answer was, ‘Oh, a good deal ails me’—‘Enough ails me.’ Then again, she would point them to the stars, and say, in her peculiar language. ‘Those are the same stars, and that is the same moon, that...
    • Contributor: Titus, Frances W. - Gilbert, Olive - Susan Anthony Collection (Library of Congress)
    • Date: 1878
  • Image 19 of General Collections copy
    Sojourner Truth's narrative and Book of life
    19 more from exposure and hardship than from old age, though he was several years older than Mau-mau Bett: he was no longer considered of value, but must soon be a burden and care to some one. After some contention on the point at issue, none being willing to be burdened with him, it was finally agreed, as most expedient for the heirs, that...
    • Contributor: Titus, Frances W. - Gilbert, Olive - Susan Anthony Collection (Library of Congress)
    • Date: 1878
  • Image 20 of General Collections copy
    Sojourner Truth's narrative and Book of life
    20 sufficiently cultivated her organ of time to calculate years, or even weeks or hours. But she thinks her mother must have lived several years after the death of Master Charles. She remembers going to visit her parents some three or four times before the death of her mother, and a good deal of time seemed to her to intervene between each visit. At...
    • Contributor: Titus, Frances W. - Gilbert, Olive - Susan Anthony Collection (Library of Congress)
    • Date: 1878
  • Image 21 of General Collections copy
    Sojourner Truth's narrative and Book of life
    21 apples, his cellar seemed more cheerless than usual, and at first neither sight nor sound met eye or ear. But, on groping his way through the room, his staff, which he used as a pioneer to go before, and warm him of danger, seemed to be impeded in its progress, and a low, gurgling, choking sound proceeded from the object before him, giving...
    • Contributor: Titus, Frances W. - Gilbert, Olive - Susan Anthony Collection (Library of Congress)
    • Date: 1878
  • Image 22 of General Collections copy
    Sojourner Truth's narrative and Book of life
    22 his behalf. ‘Oh,’ he would exclaim, ‘I had thought God would take me first,—Mau-mau was so much smarter than I, and could get about and take care of herself;— and I am so old, and so helpless. What is to become of me? I can't do any thing more—my children are all gone, and here I am left helpless and alone.’ ‘And then,...
    • Contributor: Titus, Frances W. - Gilbert, Olive - Susan Anthony Collection (Library of Congress)
    • Date: 1878
  • Image 23 of General Collections copy
    Sojourner Truth's narrative and Book of life
    23 and pleasant, and he did not dislike the journey. When Isabella addressed him, he recognized her voice, and was exceeding glad to see her. He was assisted to mount the wagon, was carried back to the famous cellar of which we have spoken, and there they held their last earthly conversation. He again, as usual, bewailed his loneliness,—spoke in tones of anguish of...
    • Contributor: Titus, Frances W. - Gilbert, Olive - Susan Anthony Collection (Library of Congress)
    • Date: 1878
  • Image 24 of General Collections copy
    Sojourner Truth's narrative and Book of life
    24 (Cæsar having afflicted for a long time with fever-sores, and his wife the jaundice,) they eagerly accepted the boon of freedom, which had been the life-long desire of their souls—though at a time when emancipation was to them little more than destitution, and was a freedom more to be desired by the master than the slave. Sojourner declares of the slaves in their...
    • Contributor: Titus, Frances W. - Gilbert, Olive - Susan Anthony Collection (Library of Congress)
    • Date: 1878
  • Image 25 of General Collections copy
    Sojourner Truth's narrative and Book of life
    25 with no one to care for her; and she lacked the courage to undertake a job of such seeming magnitude, fearing she might herself get sick, and perish there without assistance; and with great reluctance, and a heart swelling with pity, as she afterwards declared, she felt obliged to leave him in his wretchedness and filth. And shortly after her visit, this faithful...
    • Contributor: Titus, Frances W. - Gilbert, Olive - Susan Anthony Collection (Library of Congress)
    • Date: 1878