Manuscript/Mixed Material Image 231 of Federal Writers' Project: Slave Narrative Project, Vol. 13, Oklahoma, Adams-Young

About this Item

Oklahoma Writers1 Project

give him 25 to 50 licks,

-4-

f

cording to what he had done.

I reckon old Master had everything his heart could wish for at
this time.

Old Mistress was a fine lady and she always went dressed up.

She

wore long trains on her skirts and I'd walk "behind her and hold her train up
when she made de rounds.

She was awful good to me.

I slept on the floor in

her little boy's room, and she give me apples and candy just like she did him.
Old Master gave ever chick and child good warm clothes^for winter.
store boughtm shoes hut the women made our clothes.

We had

3?or underwear we all

wore 'lowers1 hut no shirts.
After the war started old Master took a lot of his slaves and
went to Natchez, Mississippi.

He thought he'd have a better chance of keeping

us there I guess, and he was afraid wefd he greed and he started running with
us.

I remember when General Grant blowed up Vicksburg.

I had a free born

Uncle and Aunt who sometimes visited in the North and they'd till us how easy
it was up there and it sho' made us all want to be free.
I think Abe Lincoln was next to de Lawd.
for de slaves; he set 'em free#

He done all he could

People in the South knowed theyfd lose their

slaves when he was elected president.

f

3Pore the election he traveled all over

. the South and he come to our house and slept in old Mistress' bed.
body know who he was.

Didn't no-

It was a custom to take strangers in and put them up

for one night or longer, so he come to our house and he watched close.
/

He seen

how the niggers come in on Saturday and drawed four pounds of meat and a peck
of meal for a weekfs rations.

He also saw fem whipped and sold.

When he

got b^ack up north he writ old Master a letter and told him he was going to
have to free his slaves, that everybody was going to have to, that the North
was going to see to it.

He also told him that he had visited at his house

and if he doubted it to go in the room he slept ten and look on the bedstead
\

PP^


About this Item

Title
Federal Writers' Project: Slave Narrative Project, Vol. 13, Oklahoma, Adams-Young
Genre
Interviews
Notes
-  Includes narratives by Alice Alexander, Alice Douglass, Allen V. Manning, Amanda Oliver, Andrew Simms, Annie Hawkins, Annie Young, Anthony Dawson, Beauregard Tenneyson, Ben Lawson, Bert Luster, Betty Foreman Chessier, Betty Robertson, Bob Maynard, Chaney Richardson, Charley Williams, Daniel William Lucas, Della Fountain, Doc Daniel Dowdy, Easter Wells, Eliza Evans, Esther Easter, Francis Bridges, George Conrad, Jr., George G. King, George Kye, Hal Hutson, Hannah McFarland, Harriet Robinson, Henry F. Pyles, Ida Henry, Isaac Adams, Isabella Jackson, James Southall, Jane Montgomery, Joanna Draper, John Brown, John White, Josie Jordan, Katie Rowe, Kiziah Love, Lewis Bonner, Liza Smith, Lizzie Farmer, Lou Smith, Lucinda Davis, Marshall Mack, Martha Cunningham, Martha King, Mary Frances Webb, Mary Grayson, Mary Lindsay, Matilda Poe, Mattie Hariman, Mattie Logan, Morris Hillyer, Morris Sheppard, Nancy Gardner, Nancy Rogers Bean, Nellie Johnson, Octavia George, Phoebe Banks, Phyllis Petite, Polly Colbert, Prince Bee, Red Richardson, Robert R. Grinstead, Sallie Carder, Salomon Oliver, Sarah Wilson, Stephen McCray, Tom W. Woods, William Curtis, William Hutson, William Walters.
-  Interviews were conducted in Alderson, Burwin, Colbert, Fort Gibson, Hulbert, McAlester, Muskogee, Oklahoma City, Platter, Red Bird, Sand Springs, Sapulpa, Tulsa, Weleetka, and West Tulsa, Oklahoma.
Medium
369 pages
Source Collection
Federal Writer's Project, United States Work Projects Administration (USWPA)
Repository
Manuscript Division
Digital Id
http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.mss/mesn.130
Online Format
image
online text

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Cite This Item

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Chicago citation style:

Federal Writers' Project: Slave Narrative Project, Vol. 13, Oklahoma, Adams-Young. 1936. Manuscript/Mixed Material. https://www.loc.gov/item/mesn130/.

APA citation style:

(1936) Federal Writers' Project: Slave Narrative Project, Vol. 13, Oklahoma, Adams-Young. [Manuscript/Mixed Material] Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/mesn130/.

MLA citation style:

Federal Writers' Project: Slave Narrative Project, Vol. 13, Oklahoma, Adams-Young. 1936. Manuscript/Mixed Material. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, <www.loc.gov/item/mesn130/>.