Manuscript/Mixed Material Image 15 of Federal Writers' Project: Slave Narrative Project, Vol. 16, Texas, Part 1, Adams-Duhon

About this Item

S* slave Stories
(Texas)

Pace Two

seers, dey come knock on de door and tell em put de light out, lots
of overseers was mean,

Sometimes dey9d whip & nigger wid & leather

strap bout a foot wide and lone a* ?<**? * end wld a wooden handle
at de end*
"On Sat1 day and Sunday nltes deyfd dance and sine ell nite long.
Dey dldn9 dance like today, dey danced de roun9 dance and jig and do
de pigeon wing, and seme of den would jump up and see how many time he
could kick his feets 9fore dey hit de ground

Dey had an ole fiddle

and some of 9sm would take two hones in each hand and rattle 9em, Dey
sang songs like,

f

Diana had a Wooden Leg,* and 'A Hand full of Sugar,9

and Cotton-eyed Joeef I disfmember how dey went*
"De Blares dldn9 have no church den, but dsy'd take a big sugai
kettle and turn it top down on de groun9 and put logs roun1 it to kill
de soun9*
M

Dey9d pray to he free and sing and dance*

When war cone dey come and got de slaves from all de planta-

tions and tuk 9em to build de breastworks,

I

S* T?

lots of soldiers*

Dey9d sing a song dat go something like dls:
H9

Jeff Davis rode a big white hossf
Lincoln rode a mole;
Jess Davis is our President,
Lincoln is a fool*9

tf I 9member when de slaves would run away,

Ole John Bllllnger,

he had a bunch of dogs and he9d take after runaway niggers.
de dogs dldn9 ketch de nigger,

Sometimes

Ben ole Bllllnger* he'd cuss and kick

de dogs,
*Ws dldn1 have to have a pass but on other plantations dey did*
or de paddlerollers would git you and whip you,
-3-

Dey was de poor white


About this Item

Title
Federal Writers' Project: Slave Narrative Project, Vol. 16, Texas, Part 1, Adams-Duhon
Genre
Interviews
Notes
-  Includes narratives by Adeline Cunningham, Agatha Babino, Amos Clark, Andrew (Smoky) Columbus, Andy Anderson, Anne Clark, Armstead Barrett, Betty Bormer (Bonner), Campbell Davis, Carey Davenport, Cato Carter, Charlotte Beverly, Clara Brim, Donaville Broussard, Edgar Bendy, Eli Coleman, Eli Davison, Elige Davison, Ellen Betts, Ellen Butler, Elvira Boles, Fannie Brown, Francis Black, Frank Bell, Fred Brown, George Washington Anderson (Wash), Green Cumby, Gus Bradshaw, Harriet Barrett, Harriet Collins, Harrison Beckett, Harrison Boyd, Henry H. Buttler, Issabella Boyd, Jack Bess, Jack Cauthern, Jacob Branch, James Boyd, James Brown, James Cape, Jeff Calhoun, Jeptha Choice, Jerry Boykins, Joe Barnes, John Barker, John Bates, John Crawford, John Day, Josie Brown, Julia Blanks, Julia Francis Daniels, Katie Darling, Laura Cornish, Louis Cain, Madison Bruin, Martha Spence Bunton, Mary Armstrong, Minerva Bendy, Monroe Brackins, Mrs. John Barclay (Nee Sarah Sanders), Nelsen Denson, Olivier Blanchard, Preely Coleman, Richard Carruthers, Sally Banks Chambers, Sarah Allen, Sarah Ashley, Sarah Benjamin, Simp Campbell, Stearlin Arnwine, Steve Connally, Sylvester Brooks, Tempie Cummins, Thomas Cole, Valmar Cormier, Victor Duhon, Virginia Bell, Wes Brady, Will Adams, Will Daily, William Adams, William Branch, William Byrd, William Davis, William M. Adams, Willis Anderson, Zek Brown.
-  Interviews were conducted in Abilene, Anahuac, Austin, Beaumont (by Fred Dibble and Rheba Beehler), Brownwood, Centerville, Cleveland and Shepherd, Corsicana, Dallas, Double Bayou, El Paso, Fort Worth, Goodrich, Hondo, Houston, Huntsville, Itasca, Jacksonville, Jasper, Karnack, Liberty, Madisonville, Marshall, Mart, Mclennan County, Palestine, San Angelo, San Antonio, Texarkana, Tyler, Uvalde, Waco, and Woodville, Texas.
Medium
315 pages
Source Collection
Federal Writer's Project, United States Work Projects Administration (USWPA)
Repository
Manuscript Division
Digital Id
http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.mss/mesn.161
Language
Online Format
image
online text

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Cite This Item

Citations are generated automatically from bibliographic data as a convenience, and may not be complete or accurate.

Chicago citation style:

Federal Writers' Project: Slave Narrative Project, Vol. 16, Texas, Part 1, Adams-Duhon. 1936. Manuscript/Mixed Material. https://www.loc.gov/item/mesn161/.

APA citation style:

(1936) Federal Writers' Project: Slave Narrative Project, Vol. 16, Texas, Part 1, Adams-Duhon. [Manuscript/Mixed Material] Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/mesn161/.

MLA citation style:

Federal Writers' Project: Slave Narrative Project, Vol. 16, Texas, Part 1, Adams-Duhon. 1936. Manuscript/Mixed Material. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, <www.loc.gov/item/mesn161/>.