Manuscript/Mixed Material Image 116 of Federal Writers' Project: Slave Narrative Project, Vol. 16, Texas, Part 2, Easter-King

About this Item

Ex-slave Stories
(Texas)

Page Three

-fl -fl -f
XAI

WI heered em talk about some slaves what run barefooted in cold
weather and you could trail em by blood in the snow and ice where they hurt
their feet.
f1

Most of the time the master gave us castor oil when we^were sick.

Some old folks went in the woods for herbs and msde medicine.
tea out of

They made

f

lion's tongue1 for the stomach and snake root is good for pains

in the stomach, too.

Horse mint breaks the fever.

They had a vermifuge

weed,
11

1 seed a lot of Southern soldiers and they'd go to the big house

for something to eat.

Late in '63 they had a fight at a place called Kingston,

only 12 miles from our place, takin1 how the jacks go,
guns'go off when they was fight in1.

We could hear the

The Yankees beat and settled down there

and the cullud folks flocked down on them and when they got to the Yankee
lines they was safe.

They went in droves of 25 or 50 to the Yankees and they

put em to work fight in1 for freedom.
lot of 'em got kilt,,

They fit till the war was over and a

My mother and sister run away to the Yankees and they

paid fem big money to wash for

f

em.

"When peace came they read the 'mancipation law to the cullud people
U and they stayed up half the night at Mr, Harper's, singing and shouting,
t&ey spent that night singin' and shout in1.

They wasnft slaves no more*

t The maiter had to give *em a half or third of what he made,

Our master

I

parceled out some land to 'em and told 'em to work it their selves and some

1

done real well,

||;;^

mv&^&t&mBk&it';

They got bosses that the soldiers had turned loose to die,

and took good care of 'em and they got good stock that way.

j


About this Item

Title
Federal Writers' Project: Slave Narrative Project, Vol. 16, Texas, Part 2, Easter-King
Genre
Interviews
Notes
-  Includes narratives by Albert Hill, Alice Houston, Anderson and Minerva Edwards, Andrew Goodman, Ann Hawthorne, Ann J. Edwards, Austin Grant, Ben Kinchlow, Betty Farrow, Bill Homer, Carter J. Johnson, Charley Hurt, Chris Franklin, Eliza Holman, Felix Haywood, Gabriel Gilbert, Gus Johnson, Harriet Jones, Harry Johnson, James D. Johnson, James Green, James Hayes, James Jackson, John Ellis, John Finnely, John James, Josephine Howard, Larnce Holt, Lewis Jones, Liza Jones, Lizzie Hughes, Lizzie Jones, Lorenza Ezell, Louis Fowler, Lucinda Elder, Maggie Jackson, Mandy Hadnot, Martin Jackson, Mary Ellen Johnson, Mary Johnson, Mary Kincheon Edwards, Mary Kindred, Mattie Gilmore, Millie Forward, Molly Harrell, Mose Hursey, Mrs. Thomas Johns, Nancy Jackson, Nancy King, O.W. Green, Orelia Alexie Franks, Pauline Grice, Pauline Johnson and Felice Boudreaux, Phoebe Henderson, Pierce Harper, Pinkie Kelly, Priscilla Gibson, Richard Jackson, Rosa Green, Rosanna Frazier, Rosina Hoard, Sam Kilgore, Sarah Ford, Scott Hooper, Silvia King, Spence Johnson, Thomas Johns, Toby Jones, Tom Holland, Wash Ingram, William Green, William Hamilton, Willis Easter.
-  Interviews were conducted by Fred Dibble and Rheba Beehler in Austin, Beaumont, Bronham, Cleburne, Corsicana, Dallas, Del Rio, Douglasville, Fort Worth, Galveston, Houston, Jasper, Karnack, Madisonville, Marlin, Marshall, Pearsall, San Angelo, San Antonio, Tatum, Uvalde, Waco, Woodlawn, and Woodville, Texas
Medium
300 pages
Source Collection
Federal Writer's Project, United States Work Projects Administration (USWPA)
Repository
Manuscript Division
Digital Id
http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.mss/mesn.162
Online Format
image
online text

Rights & Access

The Library of Congress is not aware of any copyright restrictions for the materials presented in this collection. U.S. Government employees created the materials in this collection. Generally speaking, works created by U.S. Government employees are not eligible for copyright protection in the United States, although they may be under copyright in some foreign countries. The persons interviewed or whose words were transcribed were generally not employees of the U.S. Government. Privacy and publicity rights may apply.

More information about American Memory, Copyright and other Restrictions.

Suggested credit line:

For digital images of typewritten narratives: Library of Congress, Manuscript Division.

For digital images of photographs: Library of Congress, [name of custodial division].

Note: Photographs in the online collection may originate from either the Prints and Photographs Division or the Manuscript Division. The record for each photograph specifies its custodial division.

Cite This Item

Citations are generated automatically from bibliographic data as a convenience, and may not be complete or accurate.

Chicago citation style:

Federal Writers' Project: Slave Narrative Project, Vol. 16, Texas, Part 2, Easter-King. 1936. Manuscript/Mixed Material. https://www.loc.gov/item/mesn162/.

APA citation style:

(1936) Federal Writers' Project: Slave Narrative Project, Vol. 16, Texas, Part 2, Easter-King. [Manuscript/Mixed Material] Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/mesn162/.

MLA citation style:

Federal Writers' Project: Slave Narrative Project, Vol. 16, Texas, Part 2, Easter-King. 1936. Manuscript/Mixed Material. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, <www.loc.gov/item/mesn162/>.

More Manuscripts/Mixed Material like this