Book/Printed Material Image 3 of National American Woman Suffrage Association Collection copy National American Woman Suffrage Association Collection copy

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3

He has never permitted her to exercise her inalienable right to the elective franchise.

He has compelled her to submit to laws, in the formation of which she had no voice.

He has withheld from her rights which are given to the most ignorant and degraded men — both natives and foreigners.

Having deprived her of this first right of a citizen, the elective franchise, thereby leaving her without representation in the halls of legislation, he has oppressed her on all sides.

He has made her, if married, in the eye of the law, civilly dead.

He has taken from her all right in property, even to the wages she earns.

He has made her, morally, an irresponsible being, as she can commit many crimes with impunity, provided they be done in the presence of her husband. In the covenant of marriage, she is compelled to promise obedience to her husband, he becoming, to all intents and purposes, her master — the law giving him power to deprive her of her liberty, and to administer chastisement.

He has so framed the laws of divorce, as to what shall be the proper causes of divorce; in case of separation, to whom the guardianship of the children shall be given; as to be wholly regardless of the happiness of women — the law, in all cases, going upon a false supposition of the supremacy of man, and giving all power into his hands.

After depriving her of all rights as a married woman, if single and the owner of property, he has taxed her to support a government which recognizes her only when her property can be made profitable to it.

He has monopolized nearly all the profitable employments, and from those she is permitted to follow, she receives but a scanty remuneration.

He closes against her all the avenues to wealth and distinction, which he considers most honorable to himself. As a teacher of theology, medicine, or law, she is not known.

He has denied her the facilities for obtaining a thorough education — all colleges being closed against her.

He allows her in Church, as well as State, but a subordinate

About this Item

Title
The first convention ever called to discuss the civil and political rights of women, Seneca Falls, N.Y., July 19, 20, 1848
Contributor Names
Woman's Rights Convention (1848 : Seneca Falls, N.Y.)
Stone, Lucy, 1818-1893, former owner.
National American Woman Suffrage Association Collection (Library of Congress)
Created / Published
[S.l. : s.n., after 1848]
Subject Headings
-  Women's rights--United States--Congresses
Notes
-  Caption title.
-  "This call was published in the Seneca County courier, July 14, 1848, without any signatures. The movers of this convention, who drafted the call, the declaration and resolutions were Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Lucretia Mott, Martha C. Wright, Mary Ann McClintock, and Jane C. Hunt"--Footnote.
-  Includes p. [1] first and closing paragraphs of Mrs. Stanton's address.
-  Also available in digital form on the Library of Congress Web site.
-  LAC tnb 2019-08-05 update (1 card)
Medium
8 p. ; 22 cm.
Call Number/Physical Location
HQ1403 .W6 1848
JK1881 .N357 sec. VII, no. 1, #16 Another copy. 23 cm. NAWSA bookplate. Another copy bound in sec. XVI, no. 6, p 68-69; a later report on the convention from p. 68 (in acc. envelope). Gift of the National American Woman Suffrage Association, Nov. 1, 1938.
Library of Congress Control Number
27007548
Language
English
Online Format
image
online text
pdf
Description
Caption title. "This call was published in the Seneca County courier, July 14, 1848, without any signatures. The movers of this convention, who drafted the call, the declaration and resolutions were Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Lucretia Mott, Martha C. Wright, Mary Ann McClintock, and Jane C. Hunt"--Footnote. Includes p. [1] first and closing paragraphs of Mrs. Stanton's address. Also available in digital form on the Library of Congress Web site. LAC tnb 2019-08-05 update (1 card)
LCCN Permalink
https://lccn.loc.gov/27007548
Additional Metadata Formats
MARCXML Record
MODS Record
Dublin Core Record

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Credit Line: Library of Congress, Rare Book and Special Collections Division, National American Woman Suffrage Association Collection.

Cite This Item

Citations are generated automatically from bibliographic data as a convenience, and may not be complete or accurate.

Chicago citation style:

Woman'S Rights Convention, Lucy Stone, and National American Woman Suffrage Association Collection. The first convention ever called to discuss the civil and political rights of women, Seneca Falls, N.Y., July 19, 20. [S.l.: s.n., after, 1848] Pdf. https://www.loc.gov/item/27007548/.

APA citation style:

Woman'S Rights Convention, Stone, L. & National American Woman Suffrage Association Collection. (1848) The first convention ever called to discuss the civil and political rights of women, Seneca Falls, N.Y., July 19, 20. [S.l.: s.n., after] [Pdf] Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/27007548/.

MLA citation style:

Woman'S Rights Convention, Lucy Stone, and National American Woman Suffrage Association Collection. The first convention ever called to discuss the civil and political rights of women, Seneca Falls, N.Y., July 19, 20. [S.l.: s.n., after, 1848] Pdf. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, <www.loc.gov/item/27007548/>.

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