Book/Printed Material The King's speech to both houses of Parliament, on the 30th of November, 1774. Together with their addresses to his Majesty. [Boston: Printed by Mills & Hicks? 1775].

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The King's Speech

To both Houses of Parliament, on the 30th of November, 1774,

Together with their ADDRESSES to his Majesty.

LONDON, December 1.

Yesterday his Majesty went in state to the House of Lords, and after the house of Commons had presented their Speaker, of whom his Majesty approved, his Majesty made the following most gracious Speech from the Throne.

My Lords and Gentlemen,

IT gives me much concern, that I am obliged, at the opening of this Parliament, to inform you, that a most daring spirit of resistance, and disobedience to the law still unhappily prevails in the Province of the Massachusetts Bay, and has in divers parts of it broke forth in violences of a very criminal nature. These proceedings have been countenanced and encouraged in other of My Colonies and unwarrantable attempts have been made to obstruct the commerce of this kingdom by unlawful combinations. I have taken such measures, and given such orders, as I judged most proper and effectual for carrying into execution the laws which were passed in the last session of the late Parliaments the protection and security of the commerce of Subjects, and for the restoring and preserving order and good government, in the Province of the Massachusetts-Bay; and you may depend upon my firm and stedfast resolution to withstand every attempt to weaken or impair the supreme authority of this Legislature over all the dominions of my Crown; The maintenance of which consider as essential to the dignity, the safety, and the welfare of the British empire; assuring Myself, that, while I act upon these principles, I shall never fail to receive your assistance and support.

“I have the greatest satisfaction in being able to inform you, that a treaty of peace is concluded between Russia and the Porte. By this happy event, the troubles which have so long prevailed in one part of Europe are composed, and the general tranquility rendered complete. It shall be My constant aim and endeavour to prevent the breaking out of fresh disturbances; and I cannot but flatter Myself I shall succeed, as I continue to receive the strongest assurances from other powers of their being equally disposed to preserve the peace.

Gentlemen of the House of Commons,

“I have ordered the proper estimates for the service of the ensuing year to be laid before you; and I doubt not but that, in this House of Commons, I shall meet with the same affectionate confidence, and the same proofs of zeal and attachment to My person and government, which I have always, during the course of My reign, received from My faithful Commons.

My Lords and Gentlemen,

“Let me particularly recommend to you, at this time, to proceed with temper in your deliberations, and with unanimity in your resolutions. Let My people, in every part of My dominions, be taught by your example, to have a due reverence for the laws, and a just sense of the blessings of our excellent constitution. They may be assured that, on May part, I have nothing so much at heart as the real prosperity and lasting happiness of My subjects.”

December 8. The HOUSE of COMMONS ADDRESS of THANKS to his MAJESTY, for his most gracious SPEECH from the Throne, is as follows:

Most gracious Sovereign,

WE, your Majesty's most dutiful and loyal subjects, the Commons of Great Britain in Parliament assembled, return your Majesty our humble thanks for your most gracious Speech from the Throne.

“Permit us to assure your Majesty, that we receive with the highest sense of your Majesty's goodness the early information which you have seen pleased to give us, of the state of the of the Massachusetts Bay.

“We feel the most sincere concern, that a spirit of disobedience and resistance to the law should still unhappily prevail in that province, and that it has broke forth in of a most criminal nature and we cannot that such proceedings should have been countenanced and encouraged in any other of your Majesty's Colonies; and that any of your subjects should have been so far deluded and misled, as to make rash and unwarrantable attempts to obstruct the commerce of your Majesty's kingdoms by unlawful combinations.

“We beg leave to present our most dutiful thanks to your Majesty, for having taken such measures as your Majesty judged most proper and effectual, for carrying into execution the laws which were passed in the last session of the late Parliament, for the protection and security of the commerce of your Majesty's subjects and for restoring and preserving peace, order, and good government, in the province of the Massachusetts Bay.

“Your faithful Commons, animated by year Majesty's gracious assurances, will use every means in their powerful your Majesty in maintaining and inviolate the supreme authority of this over all the dominions of your crowns that we should in us and be wanting in every duty which we owe to your Majesty and to our fellow subjects, if we failed to give our most zealous support to those great constitutional principles which govern your Majesty's conduct in this important business, and which is for essential to the dignity, safety and welfare of the British empire.

“We learn, with great satisfaction, that a treaty of peace is concluded between Russia and the Porte, and that, by this happy event, the general tranquility is rendered complete; and we entertain a well-grounded hope that your Majesty's constant endeavours to prevent the breaking out of fresh disturbances will be attended with success, as your Majesty continues to receive the strongest assurances from other Powers, of their being equally disposed to preserve the peace.

“We assure your Majesty, that we will, with the utmost chearfulness, grant to your Majesty every necessary supply; and that we consider ourselves bound by gratitude, as well as duty, to give every proof of our most affectionate attachment to a Prince, who, during the whole course of his reign, has made the happiness of his people the object of all his views, and the rule of all his actions.”

LONDON, December 3.

PARLIAMENTARY PROCEEDINGS, PROTEST. HOUSE of LORDS.

Die Mercurii, 30 Novembris, 1774.

The Lord Chancellor reported his Majesty's speech, and the same being read by the clerk,

Moved, That an humble address be presented to his Majesty to return his Majesty the thanks of this house for his most gracious speech from the throne.

To declare our abhorence and desertation of the daring spirit of resistance and disobedience to the laws, which so strongly prevails in the province of the Massachusetts-Bay, and of the unwarrantable attempts in that and other provinces of America, to obstruct, by unlawful combinations, the trade of this kingdom.

To return his Majesty our humble thanks for having been pleased to communicate to us, that he has taken such measures and given such orders, as his Majesty hath judged most proper and effectual for the protection and security of the commerce of his Majesty's subjects, and for carrying into execution the laws, which were passed in the last session of the parliament, relative to the province of the Massachusetts-Bay.

To express our entire satisfaction in his Majesty's firm and to continue to support the supreme authority of the legislature over all the dominions of his crown, and to give his Majesty the strongest assurances that we will chearfully co-operate in all such measures as shall be necessary to maintain the dignity, safety, and welfare, of the British empire.

That it is no less our duty than our inclination to proceeds with temper and unanimity in our deliberations and resolutions, and to inculcate, by our example, a due reverence for the laws, sense of the excellency of our constitution; and with the for the many blessings have enjoyed during the with unaffected zeal at this juncture our inviolable fidelity to his Majesty, and our serious attention to the public welfare.

Then an amendment was proposed to be made to the said motion, by inserting, after the word THRONE, at the end of the first paragraph, these words:

To desire his Majesty would be graciously pleased to give directions for an early communication of the accounts which have been received concerning the state of the colonies, that we may not proceed to the consideration of this most critical and important matter, but upon the fullest information; and when we are thus informed, we shall, without delay, apply ourselves with the most earnest and serious zeal, to such measures as shall tend to secure the honour of his Majesty's Crown, the true dignity of the mother country, and the harmony and happiness of all his Majesty's dominions.

Which being objected to, after a long debate, the question was put, whether these words shall be inserted in the said motion? It was resolved the in negative. Contents 13. Non Contents 63.

Dissentient,

Because we can not agree to submit ourselves with the careless facility of a common address of compliment, in expressions which may lead to measures in the event fatal to the lives, properties, and liberties of a very great part of our fellow subjects.

We conceive that an address upon such objects as are before us, and at such a time as this, must necessarily have a considerable influence upon our future proceedings; and must impress the public with an idea of the general spirit of the measures which we mean to support.

Whatever methods we shall think it adviseable to pursue, either in support of the mere authority of parliament, which seems to be the sole consideration with some, or for reconciling that authority with the peace and satisfaction of the whole empire, which has ever been our constant and invariable object, it will certainly add to the weight and efficacy of our proceedings, if they appear the result of full information, mature deliberation, and temperate enquiry.

No materials for such an enquiry have been laid before us; nor have any such been so much as promised in the speech from the throne, or even in any verbal assurance from ministers.

In this situation we are called upon to make an address, arbitrarily imposing qualities and descriptions upon acts done in the colonies, of the true nature and just extent of which we are as yet in a great measure unapprized: a procedure which appears to us by no means consonant to that purity which we ought ever to preserve in our judicial, and to that caution which ought to guide us in our deliberate, capacity.

2. Because this address does, in effect, imply an approbation of the system adopted with regard to the colonies in the last parliament. This unfortunate system, conceived with so little prudence, and pursued with so little temper, consistency, or foresight, we were in hopes would be at length abandoned, from an experience of the mischiefs which it has produced, in proportion to the time in which it was continued; and the diligence with which it has been pursued; a system which has created the utmost confusion in the colonies, without any rational hope of advantage to the revenue, and with certain detriment to the commerce of the mother country. And it affords us a melancholy prospect of the dispositions of Lords in the present parliament, “when “we see the house, under the pressure of so severe “and uniform an experience, again ready, without “any enquiry, to countenance, if not to adopt, “the spirit of the former fatal proceedings.”

But whatever may be the mischievous designs, or the inconsiderate temerity, which leads others to this desperate course, we wish to be known as persons who have ever disapproved of measures so pernicious in their past effects, and their future tendency, and who are not in haste, without information, to commit ourselves in which may precipitate our country into of a civil war.

Richmond,

Portland,

Rockingham,

Stamford,

Stanhope,

Torrington

About this Item

Title
The King's speech to both houses of Parliament, on the 30th of November, 1774. Together with their addresses to his Majesty. [Boston: Printed by Mills & Hicks? 1775].
Contributor Names
Gt. Brit. Sovereigns 1760-1820 (George III).
Created / Published
Boston, 1775.
Subject Headings
-  United States--Massachusetts--Boston
Genre
Broadsides--Massachusetts--Boston
Notes
-  Photographic copy.; Stamped on verso: Mss Division.; On verso: Ac. 373.
-  Available also through the Library of Congress web site in two forms: as facsimile page images and as full text in SGML.
-  2 duplicate copies
-  Printed Ephemera Collection; Portfolio 37, Folder 41.
-  Copy scanned: 2
Medium
1 p.; 23.5 x 17.5 cm.
Call Number/Physical Location
Portfolio 37, Folder 41
Source Collection
Broadsides, leaflets, and pamphlets from America and Europe
Digital Id
http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.rbc/rbpe.03704100
OCLC Number
rbpe03704100
Language
english
Online Format
online text
image
pdf
Description
Photographic copy.; Stamped on verso: Mss Division.; On verso: Ac. 373. Available also through the Library of Congress web site in two forms: as facsimile page images and as full text in SGML. 2 duplicate copies Printed Ephemera Collection; Portfolio 37, Folder 41. Copy scanned: 2
Original Format
book

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Chicago citation style:

Gt. Brit. Sovereigns. The King's speech to both houses of Parliament, on the 30th of November, . Together with their addresses to his Majesty. Boston: Printed by Mills & Hicks? 1775. Boston, 1775. Pdf. https://www.loc.gov/item/rbpe.03704100/.

APA citation style:

Gt. Brit. Sovereigns. (1775) The King's speech to both houses of Parliament, on the 30th of November, . Together with their addresses to his Majesty. Boston: Printed by Mills & Hicks? 1775. Boston. [Pdf] Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/rbpe.03704100/.

MLA citation style:

Gt. Brit. Sovereigns. The King's speech to both houses of Parliament, on the 30th of November, . Together with their addresses to his Majesty. Boston: Printed by Mills & Hicks? 1775. Boston, 1775. Pdf. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, <www.loc.gov/item/rbpe.03704100/>.

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