Book/Printed Material Image 17 of K. G. C. ... The following pages are addressed to the citizens of the Southern States by order of the Convention of K. G. C held at Raleigh, N. C. May 7-11th, 1860.

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17
slave trade, if others took the risks of delivering we should protect them when once landed. We should never return the poor degraded Africans now at Key West, to their old haunts of misery, superstition and heathen barbarities.

We would say to the world, the white man is and always has been superior to the black man, and we prefer the blacks as slaves to having them in our midst as equal citizens. The success of the K G. C. would compel the Northern States to repeal their treasonable laws which were enacted to thwart the provisions of the fugitive slave law. It would put an end to the necessity of our keeping a fleet in Mexican ports to protect Americans. It would kill out the Wall Street and New Orleans lobbies who are constantly compromising the government to assist them in nefarious schemes to plunder the Mexicans. It would guarantee peace and order to the Texan frontier; and the development of the valley of the Rio Grande and our Arizonia possessions, and greatly enhance the necessity and value of the Southern Pacific railroad. It would develope shipbuilding, manufacture and mining in the South, and more equally distribute the population of the country. It would employ all classes and enrich the industrious and sober. It would bring back the days of political harmony and help us with the friendly struggles of the old Whig and Democratic parties to outvie each other in serving the best interests of a common country.

The organization of the K. G. C. is simple, yet we believe well adapted to the ends in view. It was originated at Lexington, Kentucky, on the fourth day of July 1854, by five gentlemen who came together on a call made by Gen. George Bickley, the President of the American Legion K. G. C. Only two of the five organizing members have survived to the present time. A clause in the fourth article of the obligation states, “I will never desert the order or its arms as long as five brothers can be found who remain true to its work, and in case of the death of our chief officer, I will, in concert with my brother Knights who have our sacred word and dugard, proceed to elect by a majority vote a successor to the said President, and such successor shall vow to carry out the true objects of this confederation of knighthood.” The third degree has been given to but few persons, and to show that the gentlemen who assumed its responsibilities were in earnest when they took its vows, we beg to quote from the degree work the prayer which each had repeated, on bended knee, before taking those vows:

“O! God, thou creator of all things, incline us to wisdom and virtue. Protect and guard us, O! King of Kings, against hypocricy and deceit. Solemnly impress us, Omnipotent God, that we are but men, and must give an hon st account of every thought and deed unto thee. Prepare us to fulfill all the duties we are about taking on ourselves, and make us as we profess to be, brothers indeed. Make us better men, wiser and more trustworthy, and deliver us from every temptation that may be cast in our way to cause us to violate our solemn vows. Hear and protect us, O! Father, as thy sons, working for the glory of thy name, and the common good of our fellow men; make us true and faithful in all our duties to one another, and when danger threatens us, do thou be our shield and our defence—and as Christ suffered death for us, so incline us to die for one another. And now, Master, be with us in this our meeting; conduct us safely through life, and finally bring us home to thy kingdom, full of honor and glory, for Christ's sake. Amen.”

The men who pledged themselves to die by their institution, and whose hearts had been prepared for calm reflection by the above prayer, would not likely take any very rash steps. And the organization of the K. G. C. clearly shows that there was a very considerable amount of intellect employed in arranging the scheme. It is divided into three prominent divisions, and these divisions are again divided into classes, while again the classes are divided into departments. 2

About this Item

Title
K. G. C. ... The following pages are addressed to the citizens of the Southern States by order of the Convention of K. G. C held at Raleigh, N. C. May 7-11th, 1860.
Contributor Names
[Knights of the Golden Circule].
Created / Published
1860.
Subject Headings
-  United States--North Carolina
Genre
Pamphlets--North Carolina
Notes
-  Page Order: Multipage
-  Available also through the Library of Congress web site in two forms: as facsimile page images and as full text in SGML.
-  Printed Ephemera Collection; Portfolio 135, Folder 10a.
Medium
29 p.; 21 cm.
Call Number/Physical Location
Portfolio 135, Folder 10a
Source Collection
Broadsides, leaflets, and pamphlets from America and Europe
Digital Id
http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.rbc/rbpe.1350100a
OCLC Number
rbpe1350100a
Online Format
online text
image
pdf

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Cite This Item

Citations are generated automatically from bibliographic data as a convenience, and may not be complete or accurate.

Chicago citation style:

Knights Of The Golden Circule. K. G. C... The following pages are addressed to the citizens of the Southern States by order of the Convention of K. G. C held at Raleigh, N. C. May 7-11th. 1860. Pdf. https://www.loc.gov/item/rbpe.1350100a/.

APA citation style:

Knights Of The Golden Circule. (1860) K. G. C... The following pages are addressed to the citizens of the Southern States by order of the Convention of K. G. C held at Raleigh, N. C. May 7-11th. [Pdf] Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/rbpe.1350100a/.

MLA citation style:

Knights Of The Golden Circule. K. G. C... The following pages are addressed to the citizens of the Southern States by order of the Convention of K. G. C held at Raleigh, N. C. May 7-11th. 1860. Pdf. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, <www.loc.gov/item/rbpe.1350100a/>.

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