Newspaper Image 4 of The New York herald (New York [N.Y.]), February 13, 1891

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4
10 WILL m
IN 'NINETY-TWO!
The Herald Polls the Union for
Democratic Opinion as to
the Relative Merits of
Two Men.
CLEVELAND OR HILL
Representatives of the People in Many
Legislatures Express Their Preferences
for a Parly Leader.
AN ALMOST UNANIMOUS CHOICE.
The Man Who Honored the High Office
from 1885 to 1889 the One to ^hom
the Majority Look Now.
Though months must pass before the next
IVeeiiieutial campaign opens, the speculative
liiiuda of American citizens persist in revolving
the possibilities. Two men are irequentij mentioned
in connection with the democratic nomination
in 1892. Both are New Yorkers.
Graver Cleveland, after serving the State
ably and honestly as Governor, served the
nation with equal honor in the high office of
President. He was a second time the leader of
the national democratic party iu 1888, but was
defeated.
David B. Hill is the Governor of the State,
in which office he succeeded Mr. Cleveland. He
is al?o United States Senator elect.
Which of these two men does the democracy
OX tue country Wltut iu ODD vud ucuu v?* kuu
ticket in 1892
That is ilie question Heeald reporters in all
portions of tlie country askod legislative bodies
yesterday. The result of their canvass is condensed
in the tables that follow, while the
despatches from the several legislative centres
tell the story of the canvass.
BUMMAKY or THE POLL.
Cleveland....,.., 1,515
Hill
Doubtful or scattering 376
THE VOTE BY STATES.
Stales. Cleveland. Hill. In Doubt.
Alabama. 101 6 2
Arkansas........ 82 16 20
Colorado.'.. 12 6 3
Connecticut 91 9 6
Illinois 80 15
Indiana..... 97 7 6
Kentucky 82 2 1
Maine.. 46
Massachusetts... 70 5
Michigan 77 6
Minnesota 52 2 1
Missouri... 22 G9
Montana 27 9
Nebraska 32 1
New York 2 31 47
North Carolina 69 11 12
Ohio 43 16
Oregon.,.. 21 1 4
Pennsylvania 66 4 11
Rhode Island 54 4 2
Seuth Dakota 23 2
Teunessee 87 3 12
Texas.,.. 81 12 74
Washington 14 1 6
West Virginia 56 5
Wisconsin 85
Arizona (Territory) 20 4 1
DETAILS OF THE CANVASS.
GOYF.BNOB HILL APPABENTLY THE FAVOBIIE OF
NltW XOItK LKJISLAT0B3.
[BT TKLKGBAPU TO the HEBALD.]
Albany, Feb. 12, 1891.?I mads to-day a canvass
Of the Democratic members of the Legislature
as to their preference for a Presidential candidate
in 1892?Uill or Cleveland. There are sixty-eight
democrats in the Assembly. I interviewed sixtyseven
of them. The following members expressed j
themselves for Hill:?Speaker Bheehan, Dr. Bush,
cf ChemUng; Messrs. Byrne, Byrnes, Cameron,
Connelly, Cooney, Davie, Demarest, Dinkelsplel,
Drypolchet, Duffy, Dunham, Earl, Endres, Foley,
Gould, Haley, Holcomb, Judd, Kelly, Kerrigan,
Mullauey, Norris, Osborne, Riley, Ryan, Sage,
Southworth, Sulzer and Taylor?thirty-one in all.
McBride and Sutherland, of Kings, declared for
Cleveland; Roche, of New York, for Flower;
MoKnighc, of Rensselaer, was absent. The other
thirty-three were non-committal, although it is j
-...r laoaf tnonto f>f fham oxa U(1i
I failed to get an expression of preference from
any of the thirteen democratic Senators. All said
they would support Cleveland loyally should he be
nominated.
_ I
CLEVELAND ALMOST MONOPOLIZES MASSACHU- i
SEXTS.
Jut telegbaph io the hebald.]
Boston, Feb. 12, 1891.?There nover has been
serious doubt as to the loyalty of the Massachusetts
democracy to Grover Cleveland, but the
result of my canvass of the members of the Legislature
is a surprise. The Senate has twenty democratic
members, sixteen of whom were in their
seats this afternoon. When asked their preference
as between Cleveland and Hill for the Presidency
fourteen of them unhesitatingly declared for the
ex-President and only two for the GovernorSenator.
Two of the absent ones, I am told,
are satisfied with Cleveland, but prefer Hill.
There are uinety-ni|>e democrats in the House
and b >ut ninety of them were present to-day. I
was aUo to obtain the preferences of only fiftynine,
however, owing to the brevity of tho session.
Fifty-six of them pronounced for Cleveland and
only three for Hill, and I am told that a fuller vote
would not have changed the ratio.
LITTLE KHODY A CLEVELAND SXATK.
[BY TELEGRAPH TO THE HERALD.)
e, PBOVIPSNCE, K. I? Feb. 12, 1891.?In the Rhode
Island Legislature there are fifty-eight democrats?
ill teen in the Senate and forty-three in the House.
These were all interviewed to-day as to their preference?Cleveland
or 11111?for President in 1892.
Fifty-two of these gentlemen were for Cleveland
directly, four wero for Hill and two have not yet
made up their minds. Speaker Miller and Representative
Carroll, of Pawtucket. express preference
for Cleveland in 1892 and for Hill in 189tJ.
Most of the legislators said they were for Cleveland
every time. Others used such expressions as
these:? "Don't want Hill at all," "Put me down
for Cleveland good and loud," I am for Cleveland
with both hands up," "Hill isn't iu it," &c. One
Representative said:?"My individual preference
is 11111, but 1 think Cleveland is the best man to got
the nomination."
CLEVELAND DIVIDES TEXAS WITH ALL OTHEBS.
|BT TELEGBAPH TO THE HEBALD, j
Austin, Feb. 12, 1891.?i interviewed the democratic
members of the Legislature to-day for the
purpose of ascertaining their choice for Presidential
candidates in 1892. A summary of proferonoes
expressed shows for Cleveland, 81; Hill, 12;
Palmer, 41; Morrison, 5; scattering, 8; undecided,
20. Eight of the members were not seen- No third
party movement is apprehended in Texas, as the
farmers believe they can get such laws as they
want in the democratic putty.
ALABAMA NEABLY UNANIMOUS FOB CLEVELAND.
[BT TELEQKAPD TO THE HKBALD.l
Mowtoombby, Feb. 12, 1891.?A poll of the Central
Assembly of Alabama shows that body tu be
practically unanimous for Cleveland for President
In 1S92. The Senate, with 33 members, is unani
"1 1-- r? V. II,,,-,.,, ml,.
MUUS J.U* VlVIVMUUi *u MVU9WI AVV
k
NEW YORK HRRAf
bers, 76 expressed preferences as follows:? Cleveland,
68; U1I1, 6; Gorman, 1, and Campbell, of
Ohio, 1.
EEN'TUOKI KNOWS CLEVELAND ONLY.
TBX TELEGEAP1? TO THE HEEALD.
Fbankfobt, Feb. 12, 1891.?A poll of the eightyflve
democratic members of the Kentucky Constitutional
Convention now sitting here shows eightytwo
with Cleveland as their ohoioe for President in
181)2, two for Hill and one non-committal. The
body is a representative one, and the democracy of
the State is as nearly overwhelmingly in favor of
renominating tho ex-President.
COLORADO GIVES CLEVELAND THE LEAD.
|BX TELEGBAPH TO Ti'E HEEALD.]
Denver, Feb. 12, 1891.?Of the ten democrats in
vl canota frvvlf nvym?/iseo/1 o
land for Presidential candidate in 1892, four were
for Hill and two refused to express a preference.
In the House the preferences were twelve for Cleveland,
two for Hill and one for Smith M. Weed.
NOBODY Bur CLEVELAND FOB WISCONSIN.
[BY TELEGRAPH TO THE HERALD.]
Madison, Feb. 12, 1891.?The Wisconsin Legislature
Is composed of eighty-five democrats, fortyseven
republicans and one union labor man. Today
every democrat expressed his individual preference
for Cleveland as a Presidential candidate for
1892. Not one gave Hill as his choice, and the expression
for Cleveland was enthusiastic. For Vice
President General Palmer, of Illinois, received
eleven votes, Vilas seven and Gray three, while the
rest were scattering.
MISSOURI DEMOCRATS TJSDECIDBD.
[by telegraph to the herald.]
Jefferson City, Feb. 12, 1891.?I saw twenty-five
senators and 106 Bepresentatives belonging to the
democratic party to-day, and questioned them on
their preference regarding the Presidential candidacy
of Cleveland and hill for 1892. Forty were
unequivocally for Cleveland, twenty-two were for
Hill and sixty-nine were undecided.
OHIO PREFERS CLEVELAND TO HILL.
[BY TELEGRAPH TO THE HERALD.]
Coltjmbus, Feb. 12, 1891.?A poll of the democratic
members of the Legislature as to choice between
Cleveland and Hill for the Presidential nomination
in 1892 was taken to-day. Out of 81 members
59 expressed preferences?43 for Cleveland and
1(5 for Hill. The latter included the politicians and,
they are mostly from the citias and that part of tho
State visited by Governor Hill last fall. The rural
district members are solidly arrayed for the exPresident
as between tho two. The sentiment of
four-fifths of the members is averse to selecting a
New York candidate under any ciroumstanoes, believing
it impolitic, and they demand a Western
nominee.
KANSAS DEMOCRATS IN RESTLESS MOOD.
[BY TELEGRAPH TO THE HERALD,]
Topeka, Feb. 12, 1891?Democratic members of
the Kansas Legislature were too much excited over
Mr. Cleveland's letter on the silver question to
permit any satisfactory canvass of their prefer
onces between Cleveland and Hill as Presidential
candidates in 1892.
HARRISON S STATE A CLEVELAND STRONGHOLD.
|BY TELEGRAPH TO THE HEUALD.J
Indianapolis, Ind., Feb. 12, 1891?If the democratic
sentiment in Indiana is to be measurod by
the preference of the 109 democratic members of
the Legislature Cleveland iB almost the unanimous
ohoice of the Indiana contingent of the party for
President in 1892. A poll of the democrats in the
Legislature to-day makes the following showing:?
For Cleveland, 97; for Hill, 76; non-oommittal. 6.
Four of those who declined to express a preference
are thought to be for Cleveland.
GREAT STRENGTH 0# CLEVELAND IN ILLINOIS.
[BY TKLEGRAPH TO THE HERALD. 1
Sprinofikld, Feb. 12. 1891.?The demooratio members
of the Illinois Legislature ware canvassed today
on their preferences for President in 1892
with the following result:?Of the seventy-seyen
democrats In the House sixty-eight make Cleveland
their first choice and nine prefer Hill; of the
twenty-four lti the Senate eighteen prefer Cleveland
and six prefer HilL Generally they admit
that there would be more politics in the nomination
of Hilt, but they reeard Cleveland as the most
available man. Nearly all of them add this remark
to their replies to the questions put to them:?
''Of course if General Palmer is a candidate the
Illinois delegates will be for him." Several of
them distinctly express their belief that Palmer
will be in the Held.
ARIZONA OlVi'.S CLEVELAND THE PREFERENCE.
[BY TELEGRAPH TO THE HEBALD.]
Phoenix, A. T., Feb. 12, 1891.?a poll of democrats
in the Territorial Legislature gives seven in the
Council in favor of Cleveland for the Presidential
nomination in 1892 to one for Hill. In the House
the preferences are thirteen for Cleveland, three
for Hill and one non-oommittaL
BLAINE'S STATE UNANIMOUS rOB THE MAN
WHO BEAT HIM.
f T TELEGBAPH TO THE HEBALD. J
Augusta, Me., Feb. 12, 1891.?That the democrats
cf Maine are in favor of the nomination of Cleveland
for President in 1S92 oan be no better shown
than in the expression of opinion which has been
given by the democratic members of the State Legislature
now in session. There are forty-one democrats
in the House and four in the Senate. In the
House forty are fof Cleveland. One was absent
who, by the way, is known to be for Cleveland,
making the poll unanimous for Cleveland. Jn the
upper branch the same preference was expressed,
the four democratic Senators being for Cleveland.
MICHIGAN SOLID FOB CLEVELAND WITH A PROVISO.
(BY TELEGRAPH TO THE HEBALD.]
Lansing, Feb. 12, 1891.?Of the eighty-two democratic
members of the Legislature seventy-seven
favor the nomination of Cleveland if an Eastern
candidate is deemed necessary to party suocess,
while live declare in favor of Hill. Fully one-half
express a beliei that the next National Convention
will select a Western man. Michigan politicians
and tne rank and file as well have always strougly
favored Cleveland, and there is no doubt that if a
Westerner does not develop large strength as a
1 pre-Convention candidate the solid vote of the delegation
would be oast for Cleveland, so'practically
unanimous is the party sentiment in his favor.
HILL HAS ONE FRIEND IN NEBRASKA.
|BX TELEGRAPH TO THE HERALD.]
Lincoln, Feb. 12, 1891.?A poll of the democrats
of the Nebraska Legislature for Presidential preferences
in 1892 shows tua Senate to Btand nine for
Cleveland and noue for Hill. The House stands
twenty-three for Cleveland and one for Hill.
MttAttijX iUUil IU UiXBi run 1JM
ARKANSAS.
[BST TELEGBAPH .0 THE HERALD,
Little Rock, Feb. 12, 1891.?Out of twenty-eight
democrats in the Senate twenty-two are for Cleve|
land and six for Hill. Id the House sixty demoI
crats are for Cleveland aud ten for Hill. Mr. CleveI
laud has a total strength of eighty-two votes iu the
Legislature out of a total of one hundred and
eighteen. Mr. Hill has sixteen votes, and there are
twenty votes that have declared they are for
neither*
CLEVELAND A STBONG FAVOBItE IN NOBTH
CABOLINA.
[BY TELEGBAPH TO THE IIER ALD. j
Bax-eigh, jJFeb. 12, 1891?The democratic members
of the Legislature were interviewed to-day in
regard to preferences for Cleveland or Hill in 1892.
'lhere are fifty members of the Senate, ot whom
seven are republicans. Twenty-five of the Senate
democrats favor Cleveland, five prefer Hjll, while
eight decline to express opinions, some stating that
they had ho choice asT between the two. Five were
absent. There are 1U0 members of the House,
of whom eighteen are republicans. Of tne 102
democrats in the House forty-four declare that
I Cleveland is their preference, while six favor Hill.
Two do wot favor either, while one prefers any
Western man and one prefers Bayard. Twelve
were absent.
SOUTH DAKOTA ALMOST UNANIMOUS 1TOB CLEVELAND.
[BY TKLEGBAPH TO THE HERALD.]
Cha^bkhlaxn, Feb. 12, 1891.?A careful poll of the
democratic members of the South Dakota Legislature
as to preferences for President in 1892 results
in twenty-throo members favoring the nomination
of Grover Cleveland and two favoring the nomination
of David 13. Hill. This is but a sample of the
sentiment in this state regarding the preference of
the large pmjority of the people for (jroyar Cleveland
for Presidential standard bearer in 1893.
TWO MB1 IN MINNESOTA FAYOB HILL.
[BY TZLEOBAPH TO THB HEBALD.J
St. Paul, Feb. 13, 1831.?Of the sixteen democrats
in the State Senate fourteen are unqualifiedly for
Cleveland for Presidential no:uiuee iu 18'J2, ouo is
tor HiU ana ouo is tor the party nominee. In the
jD, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY
House democratic delegation of forty-two there
i are thirty-eight for Cleveland. Three oppose Hill
because he vetoed so many pension bills, and one
is for Hill "because he can carry New Yors and
would turn the republicans out as soon as inaugurated."
HILL NOT JM SIGHT OF CLEVELAND IN CONNECTICUT.
JBY TELVGItAPH TO THE HER ALP. I
Habtford, Feb. 12, 1891.?Cleveland is dearly
the choice of the Connecticut democrats as their
Presidential nominee in 1892. This is evident from
a canvass of the democratic members of the Legislature
to-day. Hill made friends here during the
campaign last fall by his eloquent addresses
at mass meetings of the democracy, but when
it comes to a questiou of selecting the head of
the nation, Cleveland towers far above him. In
the Senate the vote was? Cleveland, 12; Hill, 1;
doubtful, 2. Owing to many vacant seats in the
House it was impossible to get a full canvass, but
the figures secured were?Cleveland, 79; Hill, 8;
doubtful, 4. The consolidated vote of the two
houses was?Cleveland, 91; Hill, 9; doubtful. 6.
MONTANA FOE CLEVELAND THREE TO ONE.
[BY TELEGRAPH TO THE HERALD.
Helena, Feb. 12, 1891.?A poll of the democratio
members of the Legislature on the choice of Cleveland
or Hill as candidate in 1892 resulted?Hill, 9;
Cleveland, 27. All expressed their preference except
Speaker Conly, of the House, who is ill.
WE3T VIRGINIA OVERWHELMINGLY FOR CLEVELAND.
[BY TELEGRAPH TO THE HERALD.]
Charleston, Feb. 12, 1891.?The democratio members
of the West Virginia Legislature are overwhelmingly
in favor of Grover Cleveland for President
in 1892. The sixty-one democrats in the two
houses have been interviewed, and fifty-five
expressed themselves as preferring Cleveland
above all others. Four prefer Hill, one is
for Gray and one for Carlisle. As between Cleveland
and Hill, the Carlisle man prefers Cleveland,
the Gray man Hill, thus giving fifty-six for Cleveland
and five for Hill. Among the people of the
State Cleveland is also the tavorite.
A SINGLE VOTE FOE HILL IN WASHINGTON.
[BY TELEGRAPH TO TH! HERALD.]
Olympia, Feb. 12, 1891.? There are 112 members
in the Washington Legislature, of whom twentyone
are democrats. A poll of democrats taken today
shows their Presidential preferences to be as
follows:?Cleveland, 14; Pattison, 4; Hill, 1; scattering,
2.
BIG LEAD FOB CLEVELAND IN PENNSYLVANIA.
[By TELEGRAPH TO THE HH.BALD.]
Haeeisbueg, Feb, 12, 1891.?A large majority of
the democrats of the Pennsylvania Legislature are
favorable to the renomination of Cleveland, but
some of them express their Presidential preference
with a qualification that contingencies may arise
inducing a change of their views. The House contains
seventy-nine democrats, and of this number
sixty-eight were asked as to the favorite for the
Presidential nomination. Fifty nine deolared for
Cleveland, four for Hill, two for Governor Pattison,
one for William C. Whitney, one for John G. Carlisle
and one declined to express an oninion. Only
thirteen of the nineteen democratic Seu&tors were
in their seats. Seven of those interviewed pronounoed
for Cleveland.
HILL SCAIJC' LY IN IT IN TENNESSEE.
[BY TELEGRAPH TO THE HERALD.]
VicmmTi" 7?aV\ 10 1RQ1 t.liA flAmftprafirt
members of the Tennessee Legislature selected us a
special tribunal to choose the Presidential candidate
of the democratic party in 1892 Mr. Cleveland
would certainly have a walkover. There are
thirty-three members of the State Senate,
and of that number twenty-five are democrats.
Twenty ot the latter favor the nomination
of Cleveland without conditions, four had
previously annouuoed tbomselves for niin, but are
now doubtful since ihe ex-President has made
public his opposition to free coinage of silver und
the other does not know who he is for, The House
Is composed of ninety-nine members, seventy-nine
of them democrats. Sixty-seven of these announce
their choice to be Cleveland, three are fur
Hill, one is for Thttrman, one for Palmor, five are
doubtful and two are absent.
OBEGON WOULD BATHES HAVE CLEVELAND
THAN HILL.
[BY TELEGRAPH TO THE HERALD. 1
Salem, Fob. 12, 1891.?The Oregon Legislature
contains twenty-six democrats, of whom twentyone
favor Cleveland, one tavors Hill and four say
neither. This is the poll if the decision must be
between Cleveland and Hill.

OTHER PRESS OPINIONS.
The Boston Herald will say:?"The language is
well chosen throughout. It does justice to Mr,
Cleveland by placing hifa on exaotly the right
ground on tills isubject."
The Baltimore Hera d:?"Those who expected Mr.
Cleveland to flinch in the face of what has grown
to be a delicate and imminent issue iu his own
party ranks aro probably disappointed."
Bait more Sun:?"They will be distasteful to
some democrats, but they express honest opinions
and indicate tho possession of backbone, and
honesty and backbone are qualities the democracy
have admired ever sinoe Jackson's time."
WASHINGTON.
BE*OB GALVAN APPOINTED BT SAN DOMINGO TO
NEGOTIATE A BECIPBOCITY TREATY.
|BY TELEGBAPH TO THE 11 ERALD. I
Herald Bubkau,
Corner Fifteenth and G Stkkets, ST. W.,
Washington, Feb. 12. 1891.
The trade statistics of San Domingo are now the
object of careful study at the State and Treasury
departments. The report that Senor Manuel Galvan,
the former Minister to Washington, has been
appointed to negotiate a treaty under the reciprocity
clause of the tariff act is affording great
gratification. Senor Galvan negotiated the treaty
of 1884, which President Cleveland decided not to
send to tbe Senate, and is thoroughly familiar with
the trade statistics of the two countries.
Our trade with San Domingo has never been
large, and our exports to that country showed a
falling off for the fiscal year of 1890. The total oxports
iu that year were $1150,217 as compared with
$1,180,019 in 1889, $817,709 in 1888 and $1,032,865 in
1887.
NO CHANGE TO IiE MADE IN SELECTING CLEBKS
FOB THE CIVIL SEIiVICK COMMISSION.
The reading of the Legislative Appropriation bill
having b?>eu concluded, the committee reourred to
the consideration of the clause making appropriation
for the Civil Service Commission.
Mr. Grosvenor, of Ohio, raised a point of order
against it (except so far as it refers to the throe
Commissioners, the chief examiner and the secretary)
on the ground that it violated existing l?w.
The statute designated that the clerks should ba
divided into four classes?1, 2, 3 and 4. It further
provided that no clerks should be examined until
1 they were found qualified by a board ot three examiners.
Under the law establishing the commission
it was provided that clerks should be assigned
from one ot! the departments. Now it was proposed
to appropriate for them under the head or the
Civil Service Commission; and therein the bill was
in violation of the law.
The noint of order was sustained as to the see
re tar y because iiis salary was raised $400) ana as
to all the clorks and employes, except one messenger
and one laborer.
Mr. Lodge, of Massachusetts, said that the point
of order struck out the eutire working force of
the commission.
The decision of the Chair was sustained?119 to
SO?so the clause as to the clerical force of the
j commission was stricken out.
WASHINGTON NOTES.
j Stephen L. Stillmau has been nominated for post!
master of Greenwich, N. Y.
The House committee to-day favorably reported
j the Pacific Cable bill.
'.the Senate passed the District of Columbia Ap|
propriation bill with a large number of amendments.
Senator Cullom to-day reported favorably from
the Committee on Commerce, with important
amendments, the bill to incorporate the Pan-American
Transportation Company.
It is probable that the next steamer from Venezuela
will bring instructions to Minister Peraza,
telling him either to sign or reject the proposed reciprocity
agreement.
The Senate confirmed the following nominations;?Consuls?Jolin
L. Waller, Kansas, at Tamatave;
George K. Wright, jSew York, at Prescott;
and John M. Eager, of Pennsylvania, Assistant
Surgeon in the Marine Hospital service.
The House sub-committee reported to-day on the
case of Judge Alexander Boormau, of the Western
i district of Louisiana, finding him gu.lty of the
I fourth charge preferred auainst him bv O. J. Boat
nor relating to Ms poisonal use of the moneys paid
into the registry of his court; and the general committee
recommended that he be impeached.
Representative Caswell, of Michigan, to-day introduced
a resolution to set aside February Id for
the consideration of the Direct Tax bill, the previous
question to be ordered on that day.
Representative Milliken, from the Committee on
Public Buildings, to-day reported to the House th?
bill agreed upon by that committee tor the erecU&u
of a new Custom House ia Sew York city.
13, 1891?TRIPLE SHEET?V
CLEVELAND'S COURAGE
ADMIRED BY ALL.
His Letter Opposing the Free Coinage
of Sliver Considered Characteristically
Manly.
EVEN BY HIS ENEMIES.
Many Western Democrats, However, Regret
the Decisive Stand He
Has Taken.
HOW THE COUNTRY VIEWS IT.
[by telegbaph to the herald. 1
herald btjreac,
Corker Fifteenth and Ot Streets, N. W? V
Washington, Feb. 12, 1891. j
Ex-President Cleveland has again forced an issue
with the politicians of his party.
Three years ago it was tariff reform.
To-day it is unqualified opposition to the free
coinage of silver.
Within twenty months he brought his party
squarely in sympathy with the principles of tariff
rerorm in spite or tne nign protection nemooraw,
who declared that his course would be fatal to their
best interest.
Will be do as muoh on silver?
That is the question that everybody was asking
everybody else at the Capitol to-d?y.
The ex-President's position, of course, is not a
new one, but it is the first time he has outlined it
so frankly, and th? result was to throw the democratic
Senators and Bepresentatives into an
absolute panic. Level headed men who read
the signs ot the times aright believe that Cleveland's
attitude will do much to arrest the silver
craze that is rapidly spreading throughout the
country, and the prediction was freely made by
this element to-day that in the end Cleveland
would again carry his party with him and increase
rather than lose in popularity before the
next convention is held. But these were the exceptions.
The great majority with whom I spoke felt that
the ex-President's letter would prove ruinous to
his Presidential prospects and that the party
which nominated him could only carry the
Eastern States.
The republicans are, on the other hand, delighted
with Mr. Cleveland's action. They have feared
that if he fell into line with his party he would
sweep the West and the Northwest on the dual
issues of tariff reform and free silver.
BEAD IN THE HOUSE.
It waB for this reason, probably, that Mr. Grosvenor,
an Ohio republican, arose in the House this
morning and asked that the Clerk read the account
of last night's meeting and especially Mr. Cleveland's
letter.
The letter having been read Mr. Grosvenor said
he had thus placed this important, statesmanlike
document in the permanent records of the country
to the end that in the coming campaign it should
be available, under the frank ot the members of
the next Congress, to be used in disseminating information
throughout the country.
Mr. Grosvenor's remarks created a general laugh,
in which both democrats and republicans joined,
and which led to a rather interesting colloquy
upon the subject between Messrs. Bland, of Missouri,
and Kerr, of Iowa.
General Hooker, of Mississippi, was not inclined
t<? let Mr. Cleveland's letter appear jn the Congie*sional
Record without a word of protect. He bided
his time during the afternoon and finally secured
the floor upon a verbal amendment to the pending
appropriation bill.
General Hooker referred to the growing influence
of the agricultural class, their needs and their
right to have their noeds considered. He deprecated
the idea that the business interests of the
country alone should be considered and spoke of
the overwhelming wish of the masses for free coinage
ot silver.
He then paid his respects to Mr. Cleveland by
saying that while he wuld not call into question
the opinion of men who differed with him, he
wished to say that there was no man in this country,
wheiher he h"ld a dis inguished position or
whether he had an ambition to hold the highest
position in the gift of the American people, be he
of one party or another, who could lay down the
low t.r* t.ha trraat; maNSAR of thtt nponlft nf thin
try who thought for themselves. A hearty round
of democratic applause indorsed this sentiment.
Representative Cannon, of Illinois, bluntly
asked Mr. Hooker if he thought Mr, Cleveland
would bo the democratic nomineo tor President
in "J2.
Mr. Hooker replied with some spirit that no man
could ever hope to be the nomineo of the democratic
party who was opposed to free coinage of
silver.
DEMOCRATIC SENATORS FEAR ITS EFFECT.
Chats with democratic Senators and Representatives
showed how Mr. Cleveland's anti-silver letter
is regarded by the politicians as individuals.
Senator Daniel, of Virginia?I may say that I
regret that Mr. Cleveland entertains the views on
silver indicated in his letter.
"Cleveland's letter," said Senator Pugh, of Alabama,
"upsets his chance for the democratic Presidential
nomination."
Said Senator Barbour, of Virginia:?"The letter
j settles Cleveland as a Presidential factor leading
the democratic party. The democratic party is
pledged for free coinage. It has always been for
silver, while the republican party stands opposed
j to it."
Senator Georpie, of Mississippi, said:?"Why,
Cleveland simply has not changed his convictions.
I That's all there is in it. His letter is in exact acI
cord with his previous silver records."
An unusually pessimistic view was that taken by
Senator Reagan, of Texas, who said:?"Mr. Cleveland
could not be elected President now if he received
the nomination. That letter is fatal."
Senator Pasco, of Florida, regards it is a characteristic
letter. "Cleveland," said he, "is manlv
and bold, and this letter is manly aud bold. I am
I not prepared to say how it will aft'ect his chances
Tor the X-residenoy. History is rapidly made in
these davs. It is fifteen months yet to the nomi|
nation, and these months are pregnaut with events,
j What may be popular to-day may bo unpopular a
I year from now."
I Senator Faulkner, of West Virginia, said:?"This
Cleveland letter will make silver a prominent sub!
ject iu the next campaign."
"I am not surprised," said Senator Vance, of
North Carolina. "Why should I be? I have noth;
iug more to say."
A-'lUiSll IBS KEl-KKbtSimVKS,
i There are mora members in the House than there
ars in the Senate, and as a rule they taik more
freely, as witness the following from Iteprosen tative
Hatch, of Missouri:? "It does not change luy
warm admiration and esteem for Mr, Cleveland
personally, but I am sure this positive and determined
expression of his views upon so vital a
proposition of democratic policy places an insurmountable
barrier between himself and the great
mass of the dt-mocr?.ic party,"
Representative Breckinridge, of Arkansas, said:?
"Jt is to i early to dotermine what effect the declaration
will have, and it is not at all certain that the
effect will be adverse. Mr. Cleveland's expression
i is not a surprise, and it remains tp bo seen
whether, with the added issues of the present day,
j the people will make his attitude upon the silver
question more an issue than they have in the
past."
The letter ruins Mr. Cleveland on the Pacific
Slope, where silver is one of the great industries,
if Mr. Cunie. of California, is to be believed. "I
think," said he, "that letter practically withdraws
Mr. Cleveland from the lint of Presidential possibilities."
Representative Wilson, of West Virginia, who is
one of the leading democrats in the House, said:?
"Ihe letter is characteristic of the man and
shows his courage regardless of its effect
on his own political fortunes, that so impresses
the Amsrican jeople with Mr. Cleveland's
personality. Its effect? Well, of course,
it will temporarily alienate many supporters as expressions
arouua me indicate, but no man can
foretell its effect on the Presidental nomination of
i
Bland, of Missouri, who represents the silver
idea in the House, says:?
"Every one must see that Cleveland has made a
i mistake. Free elections and free coinage go hand
in hand, and no man can be elected on a democratic
platform who is not in sympathy with that
movement. Mr. Cleveland's letter makes his
candidacy for the Preslaency ridiculous. He will
have no following west of the Allegheny Moantains."
Kepresentatlve Dingley, of Maine, republican,
said that it was an admirable letter. "It represents
the views of all sound business men throughout
the country."
General Tracey, who represents the Albany distriet,
said:?"Mr. Cleveland having been invited
to attend the meeting at htw York acted
courteously and properly in sending a reply.
To have sent a letter without giving any expression
of his opinion would have been the act of a weak
man, which Mr. Cleveland is not. He has decided
convictions ia opposition to trying tl?e experiment
V1TH SUPPLEMENT.
j of free coinags at present, and it is better that he
frankly made them known when circumstances
arose calling for a statement of his Yiews."
IN DIFFERENT STATES.
THE EN'ire democratic delegation of THE
kansas house still e r cleveland.
[by telegraph to the hera d.j
Topkxa, Feb. 12,1891.?The democratic legislators
and politicians of this State were practically united
on Grover Cleveland for 1392 nntil this morning.
Cleveland's letter, in which he declared against the
free coinage of silver, has dampened the ardor of
soma and it is impossible to obtain a direct expression
from them.
Major Neely, of Leavenworth, one of the Representatives
from this city, said this evening:?"I am
for Cleveland and so is the entire House delegation
from my county. I believe he wrote that Anderson
letter in order that he might have an opportunity
of explaining his position."
FOB CLEVELAND IN ANY CASE.
|BY TELKGBAPH TO THE HERALD. 1
St. Paul, Feb. 12, 1891.?Xhs democratic members
of the Minnesota Legislature were this morning
busily discussing the letter of Mr. Cleveland on
free coinage. When the Hekald correspondent
went among them most of them regretted that he
took such a decided stand against silver, as this
section of the Northwest is opposed to monometalism.
Tiiey were not disposed to drop him as a
Presidential candidate, however. The general sentiment
was that he was wrong in this question, but,
after all, the pafest democrat in the country.
IT DISSATISFIES HIS OPPONENTS.
(BY TELEGBAPH TO THE HERALD. I
Springfield, 111., Feb. 12,1891.?-The opponents of
Cleveland are dissatisfied with his position on the
silver question.
KEGRET8 IN ALABAMA.
[BY TELEGBAPH TO THE HEBAI.D.J
Mohtgohery, Feb. 12, 1891.?in the House a
number of Cleveland men express regret at bis
position on the silver coinage question, but express
the hope that a silver plank will be put in
the national democratic platform so as to bring
Cleveland in line with the party if nominated.
colorado dl-mock ats fob free coinage.
iby telegbaph to the hebald.]
Denver, Feb. 12, 1S91,?The democratic members
of the Assembly were interviewed by me, and I
found that thoy were all emphatic in the statement
that they would vute for no man who opposed the
free coinage of Bilver.
missouri hesitates.
iby telegraph to this herald.]
Jeffekson City, Feb. 12, 1891.?Missouri democrats
are almost a unit for free coinage, and I
found that the letter of Mr. Cleveland which was
published this morning had changed the feeling
of some who said before they oouid give an
answer they would lite to wait a few days, as his
position on silver had changed their views slightly.
abkansas weakens.
[by telegraph to the herald.j
Pittle Kock, Feb. 12, 1891.?Twenty democratic
members of the House said that Mr. Cleveland's
position against the free coinage of silver fails to
meet tbeir idea of the democratic candidate for
President in 1892.
"A MAN OF COURAGE."
HIGH PBAISE FB<">m the leading independent
PAPEB OF PHILADELPHIA.
Philadelphia, Feb. 12, 1991.?The Times tomorrow
under the caption "A Man of Courage"
will say:?
There is one man whose name will go into history
as the heroic statesman of his age; one man
who darud to be right and to speak for the right
even at the eost of political success.
In 18K7 Grover Cleveland dared everything to
rescue the people from the most wanton taxes upon
the wages for the benefit of a few privileged
clauses. It cost him the Presidency; but his teaching
ha* triumphed by the largest popular majority
of American history.
The country is now convulsed by the silver issue,
and most of those who revolted to escape opj
pressive taxation have been misled into the free
silver craze by the dream of cheap and abundant
money. Business men know that cheap money
means the sorest disasters to the people, but there
is a flood tide in the free silver boom and it
threatens all who attempt to obstruct it.
There was no special need for Grover Cleveland
to speak on the silver issue beyond the inspiration
of heroic manhood, but ho would cease to be the
Grover Cleveland who left the Presidency proud of
defoutif he had not spoken on free silver when opportunity
presented. 'ihe Cooper Union mot>ting
of Wednesday evening gave the opportunity, and
Mr. Cleveland wrote a letter in earnest nrote3t
aaainst the dangerous, the reckless experiment of
1 free, unlimited and independent silver coinage.
Whother this patriotic expression will make Mr.
Cleveland an unavailable candidate tor President
in 18K2 must depend upon circumstances y et to
j transpire, but it will make him leader of leaders in
j honest, patriotic, courageous statesmanship.

j Free Extracts fi om J
"LIGHT OF THE WORLD,"
i i
?>y
SIR EDVVIJS ARJiOLD,
i
5 will be
published in the HERALD
i
NEXT SUNDAY,
S
5 by arrangement with 5
5 FUNK WAGNALLS.
I 4
DEMABEST'S QUEER DEALINGS.
TRUK STOBY OP THE ASSEMBLYMAN'S TBANSACTIONS
WITH THE STATIONERS.
[BY TELKGBAPH TO THE H BALD.
Nyack, N. Y., Feb. 12, 1891?The Rockland County
Grind Jury again devoted all to-day to a consideration
of the charges of forgery against Assemblyman
Frank P. Demarest, but no decision was reached.
The true story of Demarest's queer dealings with
Stationers Callahan and Gartlan is as follows:?
Domarest, in his many capacities a3 a member of
the Town Board of Clarkstown, has an opportunity
of charging for a great variety of services for that
j township. His bill for the last year, made up of
small items, amounted to $412 18. This bill was
presented recently to the Board, audited by them
at its face and placed on the town audii for payI
ment by Tax Collector Marks. The bill is in Demarest's
own handwriting, and was sworn to by him
before Justice Uoorga A. Wyre, on November 23,
18'JO.
Uueofthe charges reads"November 7. 1890.?
Paid to Callahan k Oartlau, stationers, for supplies
j for tho soveral polling places, 25."
j Last Friday when the Town Boar-i met they were
1 astonisned to receive iruiu v-uuuijr (jrum a,
bill 6out him that day from Callahan Gartlan for
1 $16 25 tor the Identical supplies which Demarest
has nworn ho paid ?or oa November 7 last at the
i rate of $24 25.
Tlie firm, who do business at No. 30 Pine street,
i New York, requested payment of Mr. Cruin. The
$8 discrepancy and the unpaid bill excited the interest
of the Assemblyman's Town Board colleagues,
and they sought ay explanation.
Justice Scibeck was designated to represent the
Board, and on Saturday night lie went to Mentmoor
and saw Demarest.
I)fmarest admitted ho had not paid the bill, but
pointed to an addressed envelope on his desk and
said:?"There's a let'.er and check for Callahan A:
Gartiau ready to be mailed.
What explanation ne made as to charging a $16 25
bill at $24 25 Is not known.
At New City yesterday Town Clerk Edward Buchauan
exhibited from his official tiles the sworn
bill of Demarest, and Tax Collector Matthew B.
Marks, who was present, showed his tax buok and
said he would frank a check for $412 18 on Wednesday
morning.
Demarest charged the town his legal fee, one per
percent, being twenty-four ci nts, for not paying
a bill of $24 25, which was really a $16 23 account.
The most nervous men among the crowd which
now assembles daily at New City are the officers of
the Hookland County Industrial Association aud
others who have been subpoenaed by Sheriff
Shankey to appear before the Grand Jury and
testify as to the gambling carried on at the associated
fairs with the alleged cognizance of Assemblyman
Demarest, their president.
DIVEK"> VISIT THE BRUCE.
Divers yesterday paid a visit to the big iron
bark, The Bruce, which rolled over and sunk in
the Kill van Kull last Wednesday, as recorded in
yesterday's Herald. The divers found the bark in
good condition and expressed the opinion that she
oould be raised without difficulty. A more thorough
examination of her starboard plates will
probably be made to-day. The fact that the vessel
is entirely empty will render the task of raising
her much easier.
1
WATTERSON Wr.OTE
THAT LETTER/
And He Stands by Every Word of
It, but Did Not Think it "Impertinent
and Insulting."
NO INJUSTICE INTENDED.
But tfcie Governor's Friends at
Albany Are Preparing for
Deadly Warfare.
AND HILL COMES TO NEW YORK
Louisville, Ky., Feb. 12, 1891.?On returning to
this city this afternoon Mr. Watterson, in answer
to some hundreds of telegrams which have come
to Louisville the last twenty-four hours, gave the
following statement for publication:?
Louisville, Ky., Feb. 12, 1891.
I wrote the letter to Governor Hill, and I was impelled
to do so by motives the siucerest and most
disinterested.
There appeared in many of the great newspapers
last Sunday a sensational account of how a caucus
of United States Senators had resolved upon retiring
Governor Hill from the Presidential arena,
of how I had b en selected as the instrument of
these Senators, and of how I had despatched him
a letter potent enough to alter his plans.
Whence this fantastic story emanated I cannot
divine, but it was so absurd and did such injustice
to both Governor Hill and myself that 1 thought,
as I still think, that there could be no objection on
the part of anybody to the publication of the truth,
whioh flatly contradicted it. I was induced to this
by the circumstance that Governor Hill seemed to
hare adopted a ojurse suggested by considerations
alike honorable to his character and oreditable to
ills juugmeut;, me uiuro ?u, iuucuu, omto mo nira
in question furnished him and his friends impartial
testimony to answer aud refute a most odious
and widely circulated calumny.
I confess that X am surprised that the Governor
should make such baste to disavow and disown a
course which, however prompted, gratified every
democrat in the United States outside the State of
New York, removing him at once from the field of
mere political scheming and self-seeking, and placing
him in the front rank of statesmen having the
good of their country and party at heart.
I am equally distressed by the representation
that Governor Hill should regard my plain but
friendly words as "impertinent and insulting." I
did not so intend them. I cannot help thinking
that the same words might be with propriety addressed
to him or to any democratic aspirant by
the humblest democrat in tbe land; and I still
hope that, annoyed by a publication which annoyed
me as well, he has proceeded upon a misapprehension
of the facts of the case.
I can assure him that neither in the writing nor
printing of my letter was there any purpose to tase
advantage of him, and least of all to do him injustice.
1 am no man's man and exist in no man's in.
terest. To use his own happy expression, "X am a
i democrat" who has passed a lifetime in the service
of principles and policies frorh which I have
never sought the slightest personal recognition
or reward. I am only humiliated by the
reflection that this service was not sufficient
in the estimation of Governor Hill to protect me
against his displeasure, and that in the harsh construction
which he puts upon a genuine and hot a
forged letter he visits me with what I must regard
as unmerited suspicion.
HENRY WATTERSON.
WHERE IS THAT LETTER?
NO BEQUEST TO TRACE THE MISSIVE?DID THE
GOVERNOR'S OFFICE CAT EAT IT?
jFBOM OUR REGULAB CORRESPONDENT,]
Washington, Feb. 12, 1891.?No request has
yet been received by the postal authorities from
Governor Hill to hunt up that Watterson
letter. The impression is that if he asks to have it
found work will be begun at Albany. It is by no
means a dead letter, and therefore never came to
Washington.
As Mr. Watterson swears he mailed it, it
must have reached the other capital, and
there is a suggestion made by the editor's
friends that an autopsy be performed
on the Governor's favorite cat, "Veto."
"Veto/" it is Weil known, is kept by David for
good luck. It was certainly "Veto's" business to
swallow that letter so as to give the Governor a
chaoce to say that Mr. Watterson is too much of a
gentleman to have ever written it. It was much
easier for the cat than the Governor to swallow it.
The song most popular here just now is "The
Letter That Never Game," although some prefer
"The Letter in the Caudle." No one knows which
the Governor prefers, but the autopsy on that cat
is awaited with interest.
WAR TO THE KNIFE.
HILL MEN AT THE CAPITAL 8HABPKNING IHEIIi
CUTLERY FOR THE FUAY.
[BY TELtGRAPH TO THE HERALD.]
Albany, N. Y., Feb. 12, 1891.?War is declared.
The Hill braves have recovered from the first
I nHna W?HAi.?nn cia rallvlnx
for revenue. It will be many moons before their
wounds hive healed and tlieir camp is quiet again.
No quarter will be shown Watterson. The plan
of attack was at first to deny that. he wrote the
letter. It was said:?"The letter must be either
acknowledged or denied. If acknowledged it will
precipitate one of the fiercest fights on record. If
denied it will furnish the Hill champious with unI
limited ammunition in the coming cajnpaign."
Governor Hili himself, after sleeping over it,' felt
no better. He is uiad clear through. He still proi
fesseti to believe that Watterson would not do such
a thing, but he has hastened to New Xprk, just the
same, to start out his scouts for the skirmish. Before
He went he said that he should not retract
anything he had said about the letter.
"i will give l^Ir. Watterson the benefit of the
doubt,'' he added, "but if he acknowledges it3
authorship I shad still call it an impertinent and
insulting epistle.''
BUILDEiW GIVEN A BANQUET.
EX-PEESIDENT CLEVELAND THE HONOBED GUEST
OF THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION
The large banqueting hall of the Lenox, Lyceum
at Fifty-ninth street and. Madison avenue, was
taxed almost to its full capacity last night ,when
the delegates to the Convention of the National
Association of Builders, that is in session daily at
tl,? Maonnle Ti.mnlo rwl t h oi r f ri?ll <1 H tn tha nnir>.
ber of 835, sat down to their annual dinner,
William C. Smith, president of the Mechan|
ica and Traders' Exchange of this city,
1 who gave the banquet this year to the
i visiting delegates ana their friends, presided at
the feast, and the guest of honor was ex-President
I Grover Cleveland.
The dining hall was handsomely decorated with
ferns, evergreens and cut flowers, through which
myriads of electrio lights flashed. There wera
eleven tables ranged in rows about the chairman's
table so that every one could sou and be seen. Ttio
toasts and responses were: ?"Our Country,'1
i Grover Cleveland; "Our Guests," Arthur McAl!
lister, of Cleveland, elected president yesterday of
the National Association of Builders; "Education,"
General Alexander S. Webb, of the City College;
"Arbitration," Kev. Dr. J. M. King, of the West
Seventy-sixth Street Methodist Episcopal Church;
"Our bister i^xchangos," John 8. ;?teveus, of Philadelphia,
and "Our City aud State," John H. V. Arnold,
president of the Board or Aldermen.
A letter regretting that he could not be present
on account of official business in Washington was
received from President Harrison, and other letters
of regret were from ex-Mayor Abram S.
Hewitt, Mayor Grant ?nd Governor Hiil. Among
those present were Mayor Koaeh, of Chicago; City
Chamberlain T. C. T. Crain, Aqueduct Commissioner
Francis M. Scutt, General T. C. Duane.
Erastua Wiman, George B. Post. William B. Meada,
William B. xuttle, Leopold Idlitz and J. E. Criuimina.
The music was furnished bv Theodora
I Thomas aud the Schumann quartet.

About this Newspaper

Title
The New York herald (New York [N.Y.]), February 13, 1891
Other Title
New York daily herald
Contributor Names
Library of Congress, Washington, DC
Place of Publication
New York [N.Y.]
Dates of Publication
1840-1920
Created / Published
New York [N.Y.], February 13, 1891
Subject Headings
-  New York (N.Y.)--Newspapers
-  New York County (N.Y.)--Newspapers
-  New York (State)--New York
-  New York (State)--New York County
-  United States--New York--New York--New York
Genre
Newspapers
Notes
-  Daily, Jan. 9, 1842-1920
-  Vol. 6, no. 1565 (Sept. 21, 1840) ; v. 6, no. 2 (Sept. 22, 1840)-v. 87, no. 153 (Jan. 31, 1920).
-  Issues for Sept. 22, 1840-Jan. 31, 1920 called also whole no. 1566-30,476.
-  Also issued on microfilm from the Library of Congress, Photoduplication Service.
-  Archived issues are available in digital format from the Library of Congress Chronicling America online collection.
-  Weekly eds.: Weekly herald (New York, N.Y. : 1836), 1840-<1888>, and: Dollar weekly herald (New York, N.Y.), <1849>, and: Family herald, 1857-<1862>
-  Steamer eds.: Herald for Europe, 1846-<1848>, and: California herald (New York, N.Y.), 1848-<1849>, and: New York herald (New York, N.Y. : California ed.), <1852-1858>, and: New York herald (New York, N.Y. : Pacific ed.), <1864-1865>
-  Merged with Sun (New York, N.Y. : 1916) to form Sun and the New York herald.
-  Sun (New York, N.Y. : 1916) (DLC)sn 83030431 (OCoLC)9517450
-  Sun and the New York herald (DLC)sn 83030273 (OCoLC)9416945
Medium
14 pages
Call Number/Physical Location
Newspaper
E457.5 .N3
Library of Congress Control Number
sn83030313
Online Format
image
pdf
online text
Reel Numbers
print1891
LCCN Permalink
https://lccn.loc.gov/sn83030313
Additional Metadata Formats
MODSXML Record
MARCXML Record
IIIF Presentation Manifest
Manifest (JSON/LD)

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The New York herald. (New York, NY), Feb. 13 1891. https://www.loc.gov/item/sn83030313/1891-02-13/ed-1/.

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(1891, February 13) The New York herald. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/sn83030313/1891-02-13/ed-1/.

MLA citation style:

The New York herald. (New York, NY) 13 Feb. 1891, p. 4. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, www.loc.gov/item/sn83030313/1891-02-13/ed-1/.

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