Newspaper Image 3 of Manzanar free press (Manzanar, Calif.), January 29, 1944

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SATURDAY. JANUARY 29. 1344
MANZANAR FREE PRESS
PASE THREE
DESCRIBE DEATH SCENE OF MR. K9
Before a Manzanar tribunal the
prisoner took the death verdict
without even as much as flinch
ing. He was led to the death
chamber, closely guarded by two
sentinels, each holding him by
the collar. The door clamped
shut 'and sealed tightly so that
none of the deadly fumes "would
Mileage Reduction Of
Automobiles Seen
In order that all centers may
comply with the Presidential or
der making necessary a 40 per
cent reduction in mileage of gov
ernment vehicles used for project
administration, the War Relocat
ion Authority in Washington has
made revisions of the trip tickets
and a shipment has been received
here.
This new trip and justification
sheet for motor equipment usage
requires specific information re
garding the business for which
the request is made. Unlike the
present form being used, the re
vised sheet calls for an anticipat
ed mileage for the request and
the time required for it. This in
formation must be filled in be
fore it can be presented to
the Dispatcher's for automotive
equipment. Motor pool heads
may or may not approve the re
quests; or it can make changes
so that the mileages may be re
duced as much-as possible.
Request for use of government
cars must be signed by the div
isional or section heads. They
will be held fully responsible
for the legal use of the car or
truck assigned to them. It has
been the practice of secretaries,
in the absence of division heads,
to sign for or make requests for
vehicles. With the new forms,
such signatures will not be ac
cepted. Each department will receive
these sheets with instructions
for filling-out. the forms. The
new forms will be put into effect
beginning February 1. Full co
operation of all departments
will be needed in order that this
plan may run smoothly and a
definite reduction seen in the
mileage for this center.
IN APPRECIATION
May we take this means to thank the hospital staff
and friends for the kindness shown our son, Garry, during
his stay in the hospital.
George Y. Yokomori and family
IN APPRECIATION
I wish to thank all my friends for the thoughtful gifts
and grand send-off.
Tom I. Watanabe
21-8-2
KEEP IN TOUCH WITH YOUR
FRIENDS IN MANZANAR
Be a regular subscriber to the
MANZANAR FREE PRESS
SUBSCRIPTION BLANK
Name
Address'
City
RATE
Month: 45c Year. $4.75
MANZANAR FREE PRESS
Manzanar, California
escape. The whirr of a motor
started the silent courier of death
through the small chamber.
Faces watched through the
small glass portals as the pris
oner weakened. Soon the body
crumpled to the floor. Five min
utes later the two humane offic
ers withdrew the lifeless body of
a dog from the chamber.
The dog was one of many call
ed to the attention of the police
department by the various resid
ents. Lately excess number of
cats and dogs throughout the
camp have created a nuisance
and possibly a potential rabies
epidemic, according to some block
managers.
Homeless, hungry hounds and
felines are picked up by the two
humane officers, Keisuke and
Sanrtei Hiraea. of the nolice
department. They are not relatedT
The animals are painlessly
killed with carbon monoxide gas
from the exhaust of a running
automobile motor in an exterm
inating box at the dog kennels
near the golf course. The bodies
are disposed of by burying them
outside the center, revealed the
humane officers.
Locally-Raised Meat
Distributd In Camp
Probably not one in a thousand
residents noticed the difference
in the pork which appeared In
the chop suey Saturday nor in
the beef 'which graced the mess
hall tables Sunday night, but the
Farming Division proudly dis
closed this week that these were
from Manzanar-grown livestock.
The livestock were received
from Nevada and other avail
able sources sometime in Dec
ember and carefully raised by
the Farming Division. The slaugh
tering commenced early this
month at Bishop to meet the
needs of. the residents.
Some residents were fortunate
In that rare specialties such as
livers, hearts and pig's feet were
prepared by their mess halls.
Since a limited amount of live
stock are being slaughtered
weekly, these scarce items are
State
Enjoy Work In Camp
Reverend Here Says
Rev. H. G. Bovenkerk first set
foot in Manzanar in January of
last year. However, it was not
till April of that year that he ar
rived here to fill the position he
now occupies. The Reverend has
been in Japan for several years
doing missionary work and he
came back to the United States
after the outbreak of war in 1941.
Asked about the Manzanar
weather, the Reverend smilingly
replied: "Well, it certainly is
different from the weather in
Japan. Manzanar is dry but I'm
pretty well satisfied with it now
but if I were to have my choice,
I would like to enjoy the 'four
seasons'.' r
He enjoys his work here and
you may find him at the Com
munity Welfare Section always
busily engaged in a conference
or helping people who come in
for help: and on Sundays, you
will .find him behind the pulpit
at 15-15 preaching the gospel. He
is also an active member of the
local YMCA.
Since coming to Manzanar, the
Reverend has performed several
matrimonial ceremonies and bap
tisms but he hasn't yet performed
any funeral services.
He likes to go mountain climb
ing, a pastime which he enjoyed
frequently in Japan but doesn't
have the time to enjoy here. Only
being sent first to places which
are in need of them, such as the
hospital and the children's vill
age. However, an announcement
reveals that every mess hall in
the center will eventually rec
eive their share.
THE UTAH NIPPO
161 W. SO. TEMPLE ST.
SALT LAKE CITY 1. UTAH
Sold at
your
local
canteen
"ARMY NO BED OF ROSES' CLAIMS
PFC. AKIYAMA FROM CAMP SHELBY
Having served five months in
service at Camp Shelby, after
being recalled to the colors on
August 9, 1943, Pfc Makio Aki
yama arrived here on a "brief
furlough recently to visit his
wife and baby, who are residing
at 5-4-1.
"Since Kwas an office man be
fore re-entering the service, I
found it extremely difficult to
get into harness," he declared
!when ask of his frank opinion
Jon army life. "The training is
hard, strenuous and rugged due
to the demands of mechanical
warfare and the constant train
ing has hardened men to a great
degree. The maneuvers are such
that all of us are sufficiently
tired at the end of each day to
fall asleep any place including
I in foxholes," he said.
ARMY LIFE
As an advice for prospective
males who contemplate on enter
ing the service, Akiyama warn
ed, "The army is no bed of roses
and if it were, "there's a lot of
thorns attached. The queer part
of it is that the niseis that are
now in Shelby go through all
the hardships for one week and
are ready for more the next."
As for the set-up at Shelby, he
remarked, "Many pertinent facts
twice has he been up the High
Sierras. As for hobbies, he does
n't have any now but his hobby
used to be "studying rural life in
Japan."
A happly married man, the
Reverend resides in Independ
ence with his wife and four child
ren, two boys and two girls.
IN APPRECIATION
I wish to thank the hospital staff for its splendid care,
and my friends for their many kindnesses, during the recent
illness of my daughter, Setsuko, and myself.
Mas Furuta
22-13-3
TOPS IN TASTE AND QUALITY!
AMERICA'S FINEST SHOYU
"MARUSH O"
Reg. U. S. Pal. Off.
n
o
1
Brewing Company
GLENDALE, ARIZONA
cannot be given but an average
combat team is composed of the
Infantry, the Artillery and the
Engineers. Attached to this is
the "pill rollers" (Medical Det
achment) and their work "is in
valuable in actual warfare. As
reported from North. Africa
wounded, the Medics have done
miraculous work and they look
upon this group with great res
pect." TRAINING
"Most of the training we rec
eive is in one form or the other
as the Company, the Battalion,
the Regimental and the biggest,
Corp Area or combined Division
al maneuvers. I felt that most of
the time "we were either march
ing, digging foxholes or waiting.
Very little is in form of sham
battle (surprising enough to an
average civilian but that is
true. Even at the actual fronts,
most of the time is spent waiting,
and only a small fraction of the
time is spent in actual battle,"
the soldier stated.
In regards to complaints of the
soldiers, Akiyama declared, "We
'bitch one way or the other. It's
either too hot, too cold, or what
are we doing this silly thing for?
At other times, we complain that
the coffee isn't made right, too
thin, too strong, or that it stinks
...or even that there's never
enough to eat. And yet we don't
have any cases of malnutrition."
442ND HTFANTRY
Akiyama stated that the 442nd
Infantry is composed of boys
from Hawaii and the States and
that only one third of them are
(Continued on Page Four)
Ask
for
it!
r

About this Newspaper

Title
Manzanar free press (Manzanar, Calif.), January 29, 1944
Other Title
Free press
Contributor Names
Library of Congress
Place of Publication
Manzanar, Calif.
Of Publication
1942-1945
Created / Published
Manzanar, Calif., January 29, 1944
Subject Headings
-  Japanese Americans--California--Newspapers
-  Japanese Americans--Evacuation and relocation, 1942-1945--Newspapers
-  Manzanar (Calif.)--Newspapers
-  Inyo County (Calif.)--Newspapers
-  Evacuation and relocation of Japanese Americans (United States : 1942-1945)
-  Japanese Americans
-  California
-  California--Inyo County
-  California--Manzanar
-  1942-1945
-  United States--California--Inyo--Manzanar
Genre
Newspapers
Japanese American evacuation and relocation camp newspapers
Notes
-  Weekly, Aug. 18, 1945-Oct. 19, 1945
-  Vol. 1, no. 1 (Apr. 11, 1942)-v. 16, no. 7 (Oct. 19, 1945).
-  Published Apr. 11-May 31, 1942 at the Manzanar Assembly Center; June 1, 1942-Sept. 8, 1945 at the Manzanar Relocation Center.
-  Collected in Japanese camp papers.
-  "Internment camp newspaper."
-  Supplements accompany some issues.
-  Available on microfilm from the Library of Congress, Photoduplication Service; also available online.
-  Master negatives are available for duplication from: California Newspaper Microfilm Archive; positive copies may be purchased by the reel; for further information consult the CNMA at: http://cbsr.ucr.edu External
-  Also available in digital format on the Library of Congress website.
-  English and Japanese.
-  "Official publication of the Manzanar Relocation Center Administration and newspaper of Manzanar Community Enterprises."
Medium
12 pages
Call Number/Physical Location
Newspaper
Library of Congress Control Number
sn84025948
Language
English
Japanese
Online Format
image
pdf
online text
Reel Numbers
0023728866a
Description
Manzanar, Calif.
LCCN Permalink
https://lccn.loc.gov/sn84025948
Additional Metadata Formats
MODSXML Record
MARCXML Record
IIIF Presentation Manifest
Manifest (JSON/LD)

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Cite This Item

Citations are generated automatically from bibliographic data as a convenience, and may not be complete or accurate.

Chicago citation style:

Manzanar Free Press. (Manzanar, CA), Jan. 29 1944. https://www.loc.gov/item/sn84025948/1944-01-29/ed-1/.

APA citation style:

(1944, January 29) Manzanar Free Press. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/sn84025948/1944-01-29/ed-1/.

MLA citation style:

Manzanar Free Press. (Manzanar, CA) 29 Jan. 1944, p. 3. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, www.loc.gov/item/sn84025948/1944-01-29/ed-1/.

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